· · · · · 

Hundreds of Nigerian School Girls Remain Missing, Activists Demand Action

The inability of the Nigerian government to recover the girls has led to growing frustration on the ground.

On April 14, more than 300 school girls, according to the latest reports, were kidnapped by the terrorist group Boko Haram from a school in the northeastern Nigerian village of Chibok. The inability of the Nigerian government to recover the girls has led to growing frustration on the ground, and activists have also taken to social media and other platforms to demand action.

· · · · · 

In South Sudan, Too Many Young Women Dying in Childbirth

Aerial of Juba, the capital of South Sudan, with river Nile on the right.

Women will continue to die far too young in South Sudan if public health strategies fail to reach youth before they become sexually active, and policies fail to address the family planning needs of communities.

· · · · · 

This Week in Sex: Chlamydia-Cancer Link, HIV Rates in Africa, and Disney Does Same-Sex Parenting

A new study may explain why there's a link between chlamydia (pictured above) and an increased risk of cervical cancer.

This week, a new study showed a possible reason for the link between chlamydia and cervical cancer, UNAIDS found that seven African countries have reduced new HIV infection rates in children, and a Disney Channel show is set to feature a pre-schooler with two moms.

· · · · · 

Eliminating Female Genital Mutilation—A Public Health and Cultural Perspective

A public service announcement in Gambia.

Culture is one of the most sensitive aspects of people’s lives, particularly as it relates to sexual and reproductive behavior, attitudes, and norms. Therefore, when we talk about female circumcision (I still cannot call it mutilation), we should always look at this cultural practice as one of many good and bad things that happen to women universally, and not only to African women but women worldwide.

· · · · · 

Why We Don’t Screen for Intimate Partner Violence in Sub-Saharan Africa… and Why We Must

In my own experience testing an Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) screening intervention in Kenya, I have found that every one of the great reasons not to screen is critically important to consider. But in the course of my work on this issue, I have also found 111 reasons why screening for IPV cannot be brushed aside, either.

· · · · · 

“It was Worth the Sacrifice:” Kenya’s Dr. John Nyamu on Why He Spent a Year in Prison

Kenya's Dr. John Nyamu is a long-time advocate for women's reproductive rights.

Ipas’s senior clinical advisor Mary Fjerstad interviews Kenya’s much-respected Dr. John Nyamu to discuss the long and difficult path he and so many other Kenyans have traveled to get where they are today on abortion.

· · · · · 

Young People Are at the Center of Efforts to End the Spread of HIV

UNAIDS released a report in advance of World AIDS Day with hopeful news about the epidemic: there has been nearly a 50 percent reduction in new infections across 25 low and middle income countries. As UNAIDS Executive Director Michel Sidibe put it, “We are moving from despair to hope.” Young people are at the center of that success.

· · · · · 

Crazy About Contraception (One Way or Another)

When it comes to contraception, the United States could be viewed as the land of lunacy. The facts and figures from that country demonstrate the power of contraception to change a society.

· · · · · 

Forced Pregnancy Testing: Blatant Discrimination and a Gross Violation of Human Rights

Forced pregnancy testing in schools is a gross violation of young women’s fundamental human rights. It is a shock to see a practice I’ve come to associate with schools in the developing world being replicated in the United States.

· · · · · 

New Report: How the US Christian Right is Transforming Sexual Politics in Africa

Political Research Associates’ latest report documents efforts by the U.S Christian Right to push an ideology hostile to reproductive and LGBT rights on sub-Saharan African countries.

· · · · ·