· · · · · 

Five Years After Dr. Tiller’s Murder, the Fight for Abortion Rights Continues

Five years after Dr. George Tiller’s murder, the Center for Reproductive Rights’ Kelly Baden and MSNBC reporter Irin Carmon join Melissa Harris-Perry to discuss the persistence of new efforts to roll back reproductive rights. [via MSNBC]

· · · · · 

UCSB Shooting and Misogyny Online and in Media

On this episode of Reality Cast, I focus on the Elliot Rodger shooting in California, an act of misogynist violence that was specifically compelled by the killer’s belief that women owed him sex and weren’t giving it up. Josh Glasstetter of the Southern Poverty Law Center discusses Rodger’s online activities.

· · · · · 

Don’t Tell Me It’s ‘Not All Men’

“Not all men” has become a meme, an in-joke among those of us who speak up in public or semi-public about feminist concerns.

In the days since I heard about Elliot Rodger’s violent spree, I’ve thought a lot about the meme “not all men”—how telling ourselves that is a requirement for continuing to exist and work in a world that increasingly requires our interactions be public, observable.

· · · · · 

Winnowing Abortion Access, and the Legacy of Dr. Tiller’s Murder

Dr. George Tiller

Five years after the brutal murder of Dr. George Tiller, our political and legal climate has only made targeted clinic violence more likely.

· · · · · 

If Boko Haram Sells Nigeria’s Girls, Is It a Crime?

A May 14 protest in Alicante, Spain, organized by the Association of Nigerians.

Now that the Nigerian government claims that the girls have been located, doubt is growing over its ability to successfully extricate them from the clutches of the terrorist group alive, and concerns remain about the fate of the girls. But if Boko Haram makes good on its threat to sell the girls into forced marriage, will it face any consequences for its actions?

· · · · · 

When Words Become Bullets: Elliot Rodger and the Patriarchal Id

Elliot Rodger

Rodger’s actions have a chilling rationality to them in the terms of our gendered society, which makes objects and possessions of women, and rapacious, status-conscious animals of men. Whatever else Rodger’s crimes are, they are not unintelligible; they merely wrote in blood what too many of us hear, see, and say every day.

· · · · · 

Surviving Wedding Season, Testing Rape Kits, and Conservative Fear-Mongering

On this episode of Reality Cast, author Jen Doll walks us through her adventures in the wedding-industrial complex, just in time for wedding season. I also have a segment on the backlog of untested rape kits, and another one on the increasing weirdness of conservative fear-mongering.

· · · · · 

Mass Murderer Elliot Rodger Was More Than a ‘Madman’

Laci Green breaks from her regular lessons in sex education to discuss Elliot Rodger, the mass murderer who shot and killed seven women near a Santa Barbara University campus on May 23, in the context of violent masculinity and misogyny. Green reminds us that misogyny actually kills people, a fact that has been ignored by those mainstream media outlets who have reported on Rodger as a lone, sex-deprived “madman.”

· · · · · 

Beyond the Hashtags: Nigerians Seek Lasting Solution to Boko Haram Insurgency

Spaces for Change, a human rights advocacy group in Nigeria, recently organized a citizens' forum titled #BeyondTheHashtags "to generate a data bank of [citizens'] concerns" about the abduction of hundreds of the nation's girls as well as the "rising insurgency in the northern part of the country."

Spaces for Change, a human rights advocacy group in Nigeria, recently organized a citizens’ forum titled #BeyondTheHashtags “to generate a data bank of [citizens'] concerns” about the abduction of hundreds of the nation’s girls as well as the “rising insurgency in the northern part of the country.”

· · · · · 

Brown University Takes on Sexual Assault… Again

Brown University

Administrators at the Ivy League school are scrambling to deal with negative publicity stemming from the mishandling of a sexual assault case—just as they did in the early ’90s, when the university made promises to improve its practices surrounding cases of sexual assault. It’s been 25 years; has Brown not made any progress?

· · · · ·