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At ‘Realize the Dream’ March, Women Speak at Last

Myrlie Evers-Williams fulfills an honor deferred, speaking on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the rally commemorating the 50th anniversary of 1963 March on Washington where she was scheduled to be the sole woman speaker, but never made it to the podium.

Women graced the podium at the “Realize the Dream” rally held to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington. But, as one attendee asked, where were the African-American women movement leaders, the thought leaders?

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50 Years After the March on Washington, Still Fighting for Jobs and Freedom

The March on Washington, 1963.

As we mark the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, I can’t help but notice that many of the gains made as a result of the Civil Rights Movement are being rolled back.

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‘The Daily Show’ Tries to Heal America’s Racial Wound: ‘Racism Is Already Half Non-Existent’

On Tuesday night’s Daily Show, Samantha Bee and Jessica Williams hosted two panels, one from the Black community and one from the white community, in an effort to get Americans talking about race. Wagatwe Wanjuki, RH Reality Check‘s online community manager, appeared in the segment.

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‘Here Is Your Brain on Race': Democrats Engage in Hearing on Race and Justice

In her testimony, Maya Wiley (above) sought to draw a distinction between overtly racist attitudes and the biases, both conscious and unconscious, that determine the shapes of institutions, and limitations to access experienced by people of color.

Exploring overt racism, unconscious bias, and the ravages of inequality, Democratic lawmakers sought solutions in the wake of the Trayvon Martin verdict.

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Women of Color and Feminism: A History Lesson and Way Forward

It is not the responsibility of feminists of color to tell white feminists we exist and have been a part of the feminist movement for a long time.

It is not the responsibility of feminists of color to tell white feminists we exist and have been a part of the feminist movement for a long time. When feminists of color or Black feminists—or whatever moniker they choose—are passed over and ignored, it is an insult, intentional or not.

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Eve Ensler Is Wrong That for Women and Trayvon Martin, ‘Our Struggles Are One’

Ensler's letter to Martin (pictured above) was not the right place to push an agenda about a campaign to end violence against women, especially without first acknowledging the fear many people are taught to feel about men of color—a fear that is just as present in the women’s movement as it is in each of the United States of America.

Ensler’s letter to Martin was not the right place to push an agenda about a campaign to end violence against women, especially without first acknowledging the fear many people are taught to feel about men of color—a fear that is just as present in the women’s movement as it is in each of the United States of America.

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Melissa Harris-Perry: After the Zimmerman Verdict, We Must Now Grapple With Its Meaning

The Martin family attorney, Benjamin Crump, talks to Melissa Harris-Perry about the aftermath of the Zimmerman verdict.

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‘How Did You Become a Teen Mom?’

Why is it that youth are bombarded with inaccurate information about sex by adults and are then taunted by those same adults whenever "it" (pregnancy) happens to them?

I never quite understand how to answer that question. My immediate response is usually, “Sex—unprotected sex, to be exact.” However, the real answer is far more complex, and some individuals may see my reasons as “excuses” so I usually don’t bother to explain it. But I will now.

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Major Anti-Rape Group Praises DNA Ruling, But What About its Impact on People of Color?

Attorneys for reproductive health-care providers in Texas filed an emergency petition with the Roberts Court Monday morning as a health-care crisis grips the state.

Earlier this month, the Supreme Court ruled that police officers can collect DNA samples from people who have been arrested for (but not convicted of) a serious crime. Many rape survivors rejoiced. But I was not one of them.

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Dear E.W. Jackson: Giving Me Birth Control Access Isn’t the Same as Burning a Cross on My Lawn

How, pray tell, is allowing low-income women of color non-judgmental access to birth control more dangerous than a group of terrorists who would burn a cross on my lawn?

The Republican Virginia Lt. Gov. candidate said Planned Parenthood has been “far more lethal to Black lives than the KKK ever was.” How is allowing low-income women of color non-judgmental access to birth control more dangerous than a group of cross-burning terrorists?

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