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Actress Lupita Nyong’o Gives Inspiring Speech on the Intersection of Race and Beauty

Lupita Nyong’o, an actress who recently won an Oscar for her supporting role as “Patsey” in 12 Years a Slave, spoke about the intersection of race and beauty at Essence‘s Black Women in Hollywood Luncheon on February 27. As Lily Rothman notes in TIME, “it’s worth noting that Nyong’o’s story about Alek Wek is a reminder of one important consequence of a lack of diversity in Hollywood and in the fashion world …Though diversity studies tend to concentrate on numbers and percentages, personal anecdotes like the one Nyong’o related remind us that it does matter to viewers that they see themselves represented in the media.”

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Black Women Are an Electoral Voting Force. Recognize.

As a matter of movement-building, the repeated refusal to recognize Black women for the electoral force that we are leaves us feeling disconnected. National organizations rely on us to deliver reproductive rights victories, but rarely give us credit for doing so.

As a matter of movement-building, the repeated refusal to recognize Black women for the electoral force that we are leaves us feeling disconnected. National organizations rely on us to deliver reproductive rights victories, but rarely give us credit for doing so.

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Chronic Pain, and the Denial of Care for Black Women

Expedited partner therapy is now legal in Washington, D.C., thanks to the passage of Bill 20-343. It's a progressive step for a medical practice whose day is long overdue.

As long as stereotypes and racism get in the way of diagnosis and treatment, young women and women of color will continue to receive substandard care.

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Not a ‘Black Problem’: Actor Jesse Williams on the ‘Indifference of Black Life’

In an interview with Jane Velez-Mitchell of HLN, Grey’s Anatomy star Jesse Williams weighs in on the importance of the Michael Dunn trial. Williams explains how the “fantasy of what the Black body does and can do has become more important than the reality,” and that Black people are paying for it with their lives.

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It’s Time to Rethink Black History Month

Rosa Parks (above on right) did not simply sit on a bus, she also fought long and hard against a rape culture that left the sexual assault of young black women around the country.

What is often lost in Black History Month are the contributions of Black women and the present-day concerns of all Black people in the United States.

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On Darrin Manning, and Reproductive Justice for Young Men of Color

Police in Hawaii successfully lobbied house lawmakers to leave in place a decades-old provision that allows officers to have sex with prostitutes, arguing that the measure is necessary for them to catch individuals who are breaking the law. Critics, however, call it an invitation for misconduct.

While reproductive justice is inclusive of men and families, what would happen if Black males were more consciously integrated into this framework?

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Paralysis Is Not an Option: What We Must Do While Mourning Jordan Davis

Honor the lives of Jordan Davis, Trayvon Martin, and so many others by taking action now. Today.

Like so many before it, the outcome of the trial of Michael Dunn for the murder of Jordan Davis reveals how deeply ingrained racism is in this country. Somehow, some way, this must end, and it is up to each of us to end it.

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Laverne Cox Discusses Bullying and Being a Trans Woman of Color

In recalling a time when she was confronted by misogyny, transphobia, and racism all at once, actress and activist Laverne Cox advocates for love and clarifies what makes a bully.

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Louis CK, On How Good White Men Have It

From his 2008 stand-up show “Chewed Up,” comedian Louis CK reflects on how good white men have it. It’s is a refreshing—and funny—reminder of how privilege affects the way we experience the world.

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Rand Paul Is Here to Micromanage Your Family Size, Ladies

Rand Paul

In the same week, Rand Paul praised his sister for having six kids but denounced a hypothetical woman on assistance who has only five. The contrast lays bare the hypocrisy and prejudice of the anti-choice movement, and shows how conservatives use children as weapons against women.

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