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How to Use White Privilege for Good

In this story from Cracking the Codes: The System of Racial Inequity, a film from World Trust, author and educator Joy DeGruy shares how her sister-in-law uses her white privilege to stand up to systemic racial inequity. For more information on this film, go to www.crackingthecodes.org. [via Upworthy]

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Debt Enforcement Policy Harms Employment Prospects for the Poor

Along with the enactment of welfare reform 17 years ago this August came tougher practices in debt enforcement—which, in many cases, lands the poor behind bars.

Along with the enactment of welfare reform 17 years ago this August came tougher practices in debt enforcement—which, in many cases, lands the poor behind bars, leads to suspensions in drivers’ licenses, and other practices that make finding work much harder.

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Fannie Lou Hamer and Her Dream for Jobs and Freedom

Fannie Lou Hamer speaks at the Democratic National Convention on August 22, 1964, at the Credentials Committee.

In an era when people across the country are asking, ”Where are the Black women leaders?” activists like Fannie Lou Hamer serve as a reminder of how many rural Black women have always been strong leaders.

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Beyond Stop and Frisk: Communities Organize for Deeper Reforms

Police in Hawaii successfully lobbied house lawmakers to leave in place a decades-old provision that allows officers to have sex with prostitutes, arguing that the measure is necessary for them to catch individuals who are breaking the law. Critics, however, call it an invitation for misconduct.

A recent court decision against stop and frisk speaks specifically to racial profiling, but we know that other kinds of profiling—based on gender, sexual orientation, economic status, and other characteristics—are often used by police.

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Where Are the Women That Need to Be Acknowledged in This Movement for Freedom and Justice?

Civil rights activist Myrlie Evers-Williams spoke at a rally honoring the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington on Saturday, August 24, at the nation’s capitol.

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At ‘Realize the Dream’ March, Women Speak at Last

Myrlie Evers-Williams fulfills an honor deferred, speaking on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the rally commemorating the 50th anniversary of 1963 March on Washington where she was scheduled to be the sole woman speaker, but never made it to the podium.

Women graced the podium at the “Realize the Dream” rally held to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington. But, as one attendee asked, where were the African-American women movement leaders, the thought leaders?

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50 Years After the March on Washington, Still Fighting for Jobs and Freedom

The March on Washington, 1963.

As we mark the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, I can’t help but notice that many of the gains made as a result of the Civil Rights Movement are being rolled back.

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‘The Daily Show’ Tries to Heal America’s Racial Wound: ‘Racism Is Already Half Non-Existent’

On Tuesday night’s Daily Show, Samantha Bee and Jessica Williams hosted two panels, one from the Black community and one from the white community, in an effort to get Americans talking about race. Wagatwe Wanjuki, RH Reality Check‘s online community manager, appeared in the segment.

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‘Here Is Your Brain on Race’: Democrats Engage in Hearing on Race and Justice

In her testimony, Maya Wiley (above) sought to draw a distinction between overtly racist attitudes and the biases, both conscious and unconscious, that determine the shapes of institutions, and limitations to access experienced by people of color.

Exploring overt racism, unconscious bias, and the ravages of inequality, Democratic lawmakers sought solutions in the wake of the Trayvon Martin verdict.

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Women of Color and Feminism: A History Lesson and Way Forward

It is not the responsibility of feminists of color to tell white feminists we exist and have been a part of the feminist movement for a long time.

It is not the responsibility of feminists of color to tell white feminists we exist and have been a part of the feminist movement for a long time. When feminists of color or Black feminists—or whatever moniker they choose—are passed over and ignored, it is an insult, intentional or not.

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