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#BecauseofThemWeCan: Young Girls Recite Maya Angelou’s ‘Phenomenal Woman’

As part of a joint project between the Because of Them, We Can initiative and Nickelodeon, in which kids portray distinguished African Americans, young girls in this video pay tribute to poet Maya Angelou.

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#BlackHistoryYouDidntLearnInSchool: A Q&A With Justin Giuliano

RH Reality Check interviewed Giuliano via email earlier this week about the success of his hashtag and the importance of showing that Black history is more far-reaching and embedded in our present-day social structures than state education departments and local school districts would have us believe.

RH Reality Check interviewed Giuliano via email earlier this week about the success of his hashtag and the importance of showing that Black history is more far-reaching and embedded in our present-day social structures than state education departments and local school districts would have us believe.

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Texas Latinas Send Reproductive Justice ‘Blueprint’ to Lawmakers

A new report from the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health and the Center for Reproductive Rights calls on state lawmakers to increase access to contraceptives, cancer screenings, and abortion care and strengthen the social safety net, among other things.

A new report from the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health and the Center for Reproductive Rights calls on state lawmakers to increase access to contraceptives, cancer screenings, and abortion care and strengthen the social safety net, among other things.

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Black Women Push ‘In Our Own Voice’ Reproductive Justice Agenda

Reproductive justice, organizers noted, is the belief that all women have the right to have children, the right not to have children, and the right to parent the children they have in a safe and healthy environment.

The agenda is “a powerful platform for us to really organize ourselves, to speak on our own behalf, and to be at the table when decisions are being made about us,” said La’Tasha Mayes, founder and executive director at New Voices Pittsburgh.

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The Washington Football Team’s Name Feeds Into Violence Against Native Women

Native American women in the United States experience the highest rates of sexual assault in the country. Some of this is clearly the result of sexualizing and devaluing stereotypes white men are still taught about Native women—including Native mascotry.

Native American women experience the highest rates of sexual assault in the country. Some of this is clearly the result of sexualizing and devaluing stereotypes white men are still taught about Native women—including Native mascotry.

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A Brief History of Policing in the United States

In light of the recent discussions about police violence and racial profiling, Melissa Harris-Perry gives a brief history lesson on police practices throughout the country.

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Still We Lead: Clarifying the Resolve of Black Women

Only when our society acknowledges what Black women are doing and have been doing to advance equality for all will people truly understand why Black lives matter.

Only when our society acknowledges what Black women are doing and have been doing to advance equality for all will people truly understand why Black lives matter.

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How We Talk About Police Intervention

#TalkAboutTheTalk shows the ways in which Black and white families may be having different conversations about police intervention, and how we need to make sure everyone is having the same conversations about race, respect, and fairness under law.

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An Open Letter to Police Officers Who Shoot First

This is an open letter to any police officer who may not understand what I and so many others are fighting for.

This is an open letter to any police officer who may not understand what I and so many others are fighting for.

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Non-Indictment of Darren Wilson Sparks Nationwide Protests

Texas, Illinois, New York, and California: These are just a few of the states where people have marched in protest of the St. Louis County Grand Jury’s decision not to indict Officer Darren Wilson, who shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown on August 9. These acts of civil disobedience mark a new wave of unrest in the United States since Brown’s death. People are tired of the racial discrimination still embedded into our society, and protesters say they won’t stop until change is made. The demonstrations documented in this video from RuptlyTV were held in Washington, D.C. on November 29.

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