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Introducing RH Reality Check Board Member Shanelle Matthews

In this Q&A, Matthews shares a bit about herself, her vision for RHRC, and—for fun—a list of her favorite things.

In this Q&A, Matthews shares a bit about herself, her vision for RHRC, and—for fun—a list of her favorite things.

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Abortion Stories, and the Equal Pay Debate

On this episode of Reality Cast, Renee Bracey Sherman talks about her abortion storytelling advocacy. Also, host Amanda Marcotte looks at why everyone at Fox News is so hostile to equal pay, and the abortion storyline in a recent episode of Girls.

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The ‘Men’s Rights’ Movement Is Hilariously Self-Defeating

Supporters of the "men's rights" movement claim to want to defend the interests of men in a supposedly female-dominated society. But if you give them a chance to share their views in a mainstream setting, their underlying misogyny becomes immediately apparent.

Supporters of the “men’s rights” movement claim to want to defend the interests of men in a supposedly female-dominated society. But if you give them a chance to share their views in a mainstream setting, their underlying misogyny becomes immediately apparent.

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2015 Court Outlook, and ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ in Context

On this episode of Reality Cast, Ian Millhiser talks about how the Obama administration is quietly winning court battles in favor of contraception. Also, host Amanda Marcotte shares clips from Irin Carmon’s interview with Justice Ginsburg and discusses how Fifty Shades of Grey isn’t the first movie to romanticize abusive relationship patterns.

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‘Fifty Shades of Grey': Kink or Abuse?

Laci Green, host of the web series MTV Braless, compares the Fifty Shades of Grey books to the recently released movie adaptation, and questions whether the story accurately displays the BDSM community or just shows an example of an abusive relationship.

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Beyond the Coat Hanger: What’s Next for Abortion Rights Iconography?

For me, and many others born after Roe v. Wade, the fixation on coat hangers as the prevailing imagery  of the reproductive rights movement excludes the possibility of alternatives that are more relevant to current struggles.

For me, and many others born after Roe v. Wade, the fixation on coat hangers as the prevailing imagery of the reproductive rights movement excludes the possibility of alternatives that are more relevant to current struggles.

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A Q&A With Judith Helfand of Chicken & Egg Pictures on Supporting ‘Vessel,’ ‘After Tiller,’ and More

Rose Rosenblatt,
co-director of Young Lakota, at a strategy session for the REEL Reproductive Justice cohort in 2013.

Chicken & Egg Pictures is the only nonprofit in the United States focused exclusively on funding and promoting women documentary filmmakers. The group’s REEL Reproductive Justice has supported films including After Tiller, No Más Bebés Por Vida, Infanity, Vessel, and Young Lakota.

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Anti-Sexist Super Bowl Ads, and Anti-Vaccination Drama

On this episode of Reality Cast, Rebecca Traister digs into how much of a disaster our maternity leave policies are in this country. In another segment, host Amanda Marcotte discusses the anti-sexist ads that aired during the Super Bowl, and looks at whether anti-vaccination is going to be the next anti-abortion movement.

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‘Grandma’ Tackles Abortion at Sundance

Actor Lily Tomlin and director Paul Weitz talk with Slate‘s Aisha Harris about the straightforward way in which Weitz’s film Grandma, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival on Friday, talks about abortion.

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‘SLUT’ Takes Direct Aim at Stigma About Adolescents’ Sexuality

The book opens with 20 first-person narratives by young people who explore the bombardment of conflicting messages about sexuality that continually besiege them. Later in the text, the play mentioned in the anthology's title—also called "SLUT"—provides a case study about the ways slut-shaming impacts those on the receiving end of it.

The book opens with 20 first-person narratives by young people who explore the bombardment of conflicting messages about sexuality that continually besiege them. Later in the text, the play mentioned in the anthology’s title—also called “SLUT”—provides a case study about the ways slut-shaming impacts those on the receiving end of it.

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