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My Story of Pregnancy and Addiction

Iowa legislators want to pass a law allowing women to sue abortion providers if they regret their abortions. Why not let women sue the people who actually caused the regret—the people who shamed and guilted them about the abortion—instead?

I am a recovering addict and alcoholic. My journey includes a pregnancy in the midst of my addiction, and unnecessary shame and a lack of compassion at my OB-GYN’s office.

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Peace Corps Ends Discriminatory Pregnancy Policy

Pregnant volunteers can now continue serving, regardless of whether a pregnancy is deemed "culturally acceptable."

Pregnant volunteers can now continue serving, regardless of whether a pregnancy is deemed “culturally acceptable.”

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TED Talk: Incarcerated Women and Reproductive Health Care

Dr. Carolyn Sufrin speaks about incarcerated women and reproductive health care at TEDxInner Sunset. Dr. Sufrin is an obstetrician-gynecologist and a medical anthropologist. She provides OB-GYN care to vulnerable populations of women, including women in jail. Her research focuses on the complex intersection of health rights and the politics of reproduction as they play out in institutions of incarceration.

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Breastfeeding’s Double (Gold) Standard

A new study suggests that other characteristics of the women and families who breastfeed may be responsible for improving their infants’ health—not just the act of nursing or breast milk itself.

The rhetoric surrounding breastfeeding in the United States perpetuates anxiety, shame, and misunderstanding. We need a different approach.

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Double the Trouble, But Way More Than Twice the Price: Why Is Having Multiples So Expensive?

A new study shows that the cost of having twins is five times higher than the cost of having one baby; triplets or more can cost as much as $400,000. The researchers suggest this is yet another reason to reduce the number of embryos transferred during in vitro fertilization.

A new study shows that the cost of having twins is five times higher than the cost of having one baby; triplets or more can cost as much as $400,000. The researchers suggest this is yet another reason to reduce the number of embryos transferred during in vitro fertilization.

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New Definitions of Full-Term Pregnancy: Why They Matter

The new definitions hopefully will be a catalyst for the cultural shift toward allowing labor and delivery to begin on its own.

The new definitions endorsed by the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecologists hopefully will be a catalyst for a cultural shift toward allowing labor to begin on its own.

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Study: BPA Exposure May Increase Miscarriage Risk for Some Women

While a new study on BPA is far from definitive, it adds to a growing debate over how everyday chemicals affect reproductive health.

While a new study on BPA is far from definitive, it adds to a growing debate over how everyday chemicals affect reproductive health.

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Why Don’t More People Care About Black Maternal Deaths?

In September, 19-year-old Ayaanah Gibson (above) bled to death in her Benedict College dorm room after delivering a stillborn child.

What will it take to get people to recognize not just the racial disparity in death rates but the disparity in concern over U.S. Black women’s health and lives?

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How Doctors Date Pregnancies, Explained

Health-care providers define the stage or length of pregnancy differently than many people might think.

A health-care provider explains the three methods of pregnancy dating—last menstrual period, ultrasound, and a physical exam—and how medical professionals use them.

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Sushi and Wine for Mothers-to-Be? New Book Suggests Pregnancy Rules Are Arbitrary

A new book questions the list of rules—from skipping the bar to skipping the sushi bar—that most women are given during their first prenatal visit.

A new book questions the list of rules—from skipping the bar to avoiding deli meat—that most pregnant people are given during their first prenatal visit. Emily Oster, an economist, looks at the research and suggests many rules are based on caution rather than data. But many experts question her credentials.

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