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Oklahoma Follows Texas’ Lead With Law to Limit Abortion Access

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin signed a bill into law Wednesday that requires abortion providers to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital, among other medically unnecessary requirements for clinics in the state.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin signed a bill into law Wednesday that requires abortion providers to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital, among other medically unnecessary requirements for clinics in the state.

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Reflections on the Fifth Anniversary of the Assassination of Dr. George Tiller

Many of those who knew Dr. Tiller as a colleague and friend are no doubt fortified by remembering one of his favorite sayings: “Attitude is everything.”

The road ahead for abortion providers and their allies to not only preserve George Tiller’s specialized service, but simply to stay open, is hardly an easy one. But many of those who knew Dr. Tiller as a colleague and friend are no doubt fortified by remembering one of his favorite sayings: “Attitude is everything.”

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New Hampshire Governor to Sign Bill Creating Abortion Clinic Buffer Zone

New Hampshire will join a growing number of states and municipalities that have passed restrictions on anti-choice protests at reproductive health care clinics.

On Thursday, the state senate voted on final passage of a bill that would create a 25-foot buffer zone around the five clinics in the state that provide abortion services.

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Listen to Youth: Adult Allies Must Support the Repeal of Illinois’ Forced Parental Notification Law

While forced parental involvement laws aren’t new, more states have been passing them or tightening their existing laws to decrease access to abortion for teens.

While forced parental involvement laws aren’t new, more states have been passing them or tightening their existing laws to decrease access to abortion for teens.

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Huge Portion of the United States May Lose Abortion Access

Melissa Harris-Perry explains recent attempts to restrict abortion access in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas—which when taken together could leave a huge part of the United States without access to full reproductive health care. [via MSNBC]

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Oklahoma Senate Passes Admitting Privileges Bill (Corrected)

The Oklahoma capitol building.

A day after the Louisiana legislature passed a bill modeled after a Texas law that has severely restricted access to safe, legal abortion in the state, the Oklahoma senate has done the same.

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Four Ways to Create Culture Change Around Abortion

#ihadanabortion

Culture change is distinct from policy change and health-care access, but it’s just as important. It’s difficult to imagine long-term policy gains without doing the hard work to change norms, beliefs, and behavior.

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Kids React to Gay Marriage

This episode of Kids React, by the Fine Brothers, explores gay marriage by asking children what they think about various aspects of oppositional arguments and beliefs. While the reactions show an uplifting amount of gay and lesbian relationship normalization and acceptance, they also display an early exposure and internalization of homophobia.

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Louisiana Legislature Sends Omnibus Anti-Abortion Bill to Gov. Jindal, Reproductive Rights Advocates Call for Boycott

In response to the passage of the legislation, reproductive rights advocates have called for boycotting the state.

Without any debate, the Louisiana House of Representatives passed a bill Wednesday that would impose regulations aimed at severely limiting access to abortion. It is expected to be signed by Gov. Bobby Jindal.

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Campaign for Mississippi ‘Personhood’ Ballot Initiative Fails

The proposed state constitutional amendment declaring that life begins at conception was nearly identical to an initiative that was rejected by 58 percent of Mississippi voters in 2011.

The proposed state constitutional amendment declaring that life begins at conception was nearly identical to an initiative that was rejected by 58 percent of Mississippi voters in 2011.

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