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How America’s Obsession With ‘Bad Birth Control’ Harms Women

Many women know more about the risks of birth control than about how the right contraceptive might improve their lives.

Many women know more about the risks of birth control than about how the right contraceptive might improve their lives.

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Using Aikido to Change the Abortion Conversation

Aikido is a Japanese martial art that makes use of the attacker’s own momentum as a defensive strategy.

Aikido is a Japanese martial art that makes use of the attacker’s own momentum as a defensive strategy. I suggest pro-choicers take the disgust, found on posters with anti-abortion messages or pictures of fetal remains, and in a non-confrontational, nonviolent way, amplify and redirect it.

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Abortion as a Blessing, Grace, or Gift: Changing the Conversation on Reproductive Rights and Moral Values

If we want Americans to understand and distance themselves from the moral emptiness of the “pro-life” movement, we will have to challenge the patriarchs on their home turf, in their position as moral guides.

If we want Americans to understand and distance themselves from the moral emptiness of the “pro-life” movement, we will have to challenge the patriarchs on their home turf, in their position as moral guides.

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Better Birth Control for Men: 8 Promising Possibilities

Today, research on male contraception is 50 years behind research on female contraception.

We all, men and women alike, should be demanding better birth control for men.

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Why a 20-Week Abortion Ban Is Unthinkable: One Woman’s Near-Death Experience

A federal judge has declared part of Texas' abortion law to be unconstitutional, blocking a provision that requires abortion providers to secure admitting privileges at hospitals within 30 miles of where they perform abortion procedures.

Childbearing is inherently dangerous, and it is time that the risks of pregnancy became a part of our national conversation about contraception and abortion.

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Do Religious Restrictions Force Doctors to Commit Malpractice?

Across the U.S., religious healthcare corporations are absorbing once secular and independent hospitals and in the process imposing religious restrictions that sometimes pit standard medical practice against theology.

Across the United States, religious health-care corporations are absorbing once secular and independent hospitals and in the process imposing religious restrictions that sometimes pit standard medical practice against theology.

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