· · · · · 

Meeting the Reproductive Health Needs of Women and Girls Affected by the Pakistan Floods

The Pakistan floods have reminded us that the needs of women and girls must not be forgotten.  A statement, just released by the Reproductive Health Response in Crisis (RHRC) Consortium, underscores what should be done in Pakistan to provide the minimum services until the situation stabilizes.

 

· · · · · 

The War Continues for Women of Sierra Leone

Although the civil war in Sierra Leone ended in 2002, women in the country are still facing another deadly front—sexual and gender-based violence.  Sexual and gender based violence has continued unflinchingly into the post-war years. Glasgow, head of the International Rescue Committee (IRC) said, “We saw rape and sexual violence used as a tool during the war, and now it is morphing into this culture’s society as something that is understood and even accepted.”

· · · · · 

Kyrgyz Women Need More Than Food and Water

The conflict in Kyrgyzstan is spiraling out of control. Ethnic Uzbeks are fleeing their homes in Kyrgyzstan for safety while their houses are being burned. As in most conflicts around the world, this devastation is often felt by women who, while displaced, lack access to lifesaving reproductive health services. Further violence means that a country, which is already experiencing a dramatic increase in maternal mortality increase will face deterioration in quality reproductive health services.

· · · · · 

The Every Day “Jaycee’s”





Eighteen years ago, Jaycee Dugard was kidnapped and made into a slave, bearing two children after being raped by her captor. Americans are outraged, and rightly so. Her story is horrifying. While this Lake Tahoe headline hit particularly close to home, most of us are perhaps unaware that kidnappings and sexual slavery occur every day in war torn areas.

· · · · · 

World Humanitarian Day- RH in Conflict Areas









 
Today markes World Humanitarian Day,  a time to celebrate the efforts of men and women who work to save lives in war and natural disaster.

 Though we have come a long way in recognizing the right of reproductive health for refugees, there is much to be done.  Displaced populations in humanitarian settings continue to fall through the cracks, especially since food, water, and shelter are prioritized. While on the move for safety, women are particularly vulnerable to unwanted pregnancy, death during childbirth, sexual violence and STIs.  

· · · · · 

The Long Wait: Reproductive Health Care in Haiti

Last month, Haiti’s donor conference raised money for a nation that has weathered storms time and time again.  The pledges added to the previously committed $3 billion in international assistance.  While all of this may seem like a large amount of money for a small Caribbean island, little investment in reproductive health has undermined overall goals of poverty alleviation. A new report highlights the gaps in reproductive health in Haiti, where re-occuring crises place women and families at risk.

· · · · · 

Mother’s of a Different Reality




31 people have died from swine flu-multiply that
by 17,290 and you come close to the 536,000 pregnant women who die every year
from largely preventable causes.



It is not surprising that the countries with the
highest maternal mortality are war-torn. 
Perhaps best said by a woman in Eastern Congo,
"We are victims of war.  We don’t take up
arms, but we, the women suffer the most."

· · · · ·