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Running the Political Table: Clinton, Rice, and the New Crop of Women Legislators

In 2012, political women everywhere “suited up,” joined the game, stepped-up to bat, and hit the ball out of the park. We are now in the major political leagues. (Say, running for U.S. Senate and House seats.) We are in the political rooms. We are at the table in those rooms. Now, the question is: how to run that table?

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Deal With It, Girlfriends: Bill Clinton Teaches Women Candidates How to Win

In the light of this great day for us social justice advocates, something else came to mind as I reflected on Bill Clinton’s presence at the DNC: His comeback (forget New Hampshire, his comeback in the whole wide world) and just how instructive it is for women candidates now vying for office.

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Paul Ryan Pick Presents Unique Conundrum for Republican Women Voters

And therein lies the conundrum for Republican women voters as they consider their vote come Election Day 2012. When the U.S. is as politically polarized as it’s ever been, now epitomized by the Obama-Biden and Romney-Ryan presidential tickets, will women voters join these women elected officials and vote against their self interest?

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Winning the Race for Choice? We Need Missy “the Missile” Franklin’s Gold-medal Strategy

“There is no silver in politics,” as Carol Bellamy, girl politico and former director of UNICEF, said to me recently. While we’re still swimming, we’re not winning the race to keep abortion safe and legal.

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New Networked Feminism Just Like the Old Networked Feminism: Organize or Die.

Back in the day, we talked and connected and networked to get organized. Today, led by my younger sisters, we are doing just the same. We didn’t “chit and chat.” We organized against the abuses of power, just as we do today. This is the best history report I could imagine reading during women’s history month. Let’s keep writing this report.

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Did You See Saul Alinsky the Other Night at The Kennedy Center?

As President Obama and Rev. Sharpton entered The Kennedy Center, I got shivers down my spine. For, I could feel Saul Alinsky guiding them as they took their seats. There were these two men, trained in Alinsky’s methodology for achieving American justice, together to celebrate the life and work of another American justice-teacher, Dr. Martin Luther King, entering the President’s box.

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Kantor Book Kerfluffle Misses the Point: Michelle Obama Could Be This Generation’s Eleanor Roosevelt

Michelle Obama is no “angry black woman.” But she could be this generation’s Eleanor Roosevelt, and an angry black woman who is just as angry as her angry white, brown, yellow and red sisters because America still has hungry and homeless people; because America has too many people who want to work, but who can’t find jobs; and because America these days works for only a few of its citizens when it’s supposed to work “…for all.” 

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The Inside Hardball on Obama’s Emergency Contraception Decision?

I got to thinking about what else the President’s decision portends. The essence of successful politicians like, say, Margaret Hamburg and Kathleen Sebelius, is three-fold. What starts all over every morning is the (political) big leagues ballgame. What starts over every day in these big leagues, just like the baseball ones, is a game that is played only one way: the hardball way.

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Girlfriends: When Men Are Deciding What Women Should Have, It’s Time To Head for the Hills (and Make a Plan)

So, what have we got in this latest reproductive rights crisis? The one where the Catholic bishops and the President are debating and deciding what rights we American women will have?  Well, sadly, ad nauseum, and once again, what we’ve got is no woman sitting at the decision-making table.

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“Mississippi Goddamn.” Nina Simone Said It. Last Night, I Thought It.

Like in so many other American home-places, black and white Mississippians see things differently, and, consequently, vote differently. As Mississippians proved last night, when things get really, really bad, together, we get our act together; we overcome. Now we all need to keep working to overcome exclusionary voter ID laws.

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