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Preparing for the Trans Baby Boom

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While more and more trans people are considering pregnancy and birth, very few providers in that field are equipped to provide adequate care.

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Maternity Care in a “Majority Minority” Country

Race-based maternal health disparities are no longer a concern of the minority — they are a concern of the majority. And they should be a top priority. If Medicaid doesn’t make room for alternative, potentially life saving maternal health models, we risk endangering the health of generations to come.

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Holding Pregnant Women and Providers to a Dangerous, Unattainable Standard

There is a disturbing trend on the rise in the U.S., one that crosses into many arenas — from legislation to insurance policy to our judicial system to the way individuals interact with their medical providers. The trend? Making women responsible for healthy birth outcomes and jailing them when they don’t meet this unattainable standard.

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Remembering Bei Bei Shuai on Mama’s Day

Bei Bei Shuai. (img src)

Almost two months ago, I wrote about Bei Bei Shuai on my blog, Radical Doula. Now it’s Mama’s Day, and Bei Bei is still in prison.

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What’s the Real Problem Regarding the Scapegoating of Immigrant Women?

As part of this year’s Latina Week of Action for Reproductive Justice NLIRH is hosting a blog carnival centered around the topic of immigrant women. The question we’ve posed:  “What’s the real problem” when it comes to the scapegoating of immigrant women?

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Worried About Women of Color? Thanks, But No Thanks, Anti-Choicers. We’ve Got It Covered.

The anti-choice movement uses false concern about women of color in a classic effort to divide-and-conquer. Reproductive justice advocates say thanks but no thanks…we’ve got it covered.

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Surrogacy: The Next Frontier for Reproductive Justice

Surrogacy is a complicated subject, to say the least. It involves many of the issues central to reproductive justice—bodily autonomy, a woman’s right to abortion, definitions of parenthood, and custody of children. It’s also an option increasingly relied upon by gay couples—usually gay men—to create families. It invariably brings up concerns about racial and economic justice when the majority of surrogates are low-income and many are women of color. It’s an issue on which few reproductive rights and justice groups are working on but one that deserves our close attention.

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Barriers to Home Birth Fall in Washington State

Thanks to a history of expansive access to midwifery care and a number of big legislative gains, low-income women in Washington State now have more birthing options than most women around the country.

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The Cost of Being Born At Home

Upwardly-mobile moms may finally be catching on to the benefits of midwifery and homebirth, but low-income women are still firmly planted in the hospital, most often with medicalized births overseen by doctors.

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The Myth of the Elective C-Section

When the media covers the rising rate of c-section, it’s often ready to lay the blame at the feet of a woman we’re come to know well over the last few years — the busy career mom scheduling her delivery between important business deals. But while some moms may be requesting surgical birth, research shows that has little to do with the overall increase in c-section rates nationwide.

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