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Clearing Up Confusion: Emergency Contraception and Weight

Once again, politics have trumped science, and it’s women and girls who pay the price.

RH Reality Check takes a look at the recent media storm around emergency contraception and weight and explains what readers need to know about the research.

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This Week in Sex: Meningitis Outbreak Update, Viagra Cures Menstrual Cramps, and a Male Birth Control Pill

New research suggests that the little blue pill for men may be able to stop menstrual cramps in women.

This week, an update on meningitis outbreaks at Princeton and the University of California, Santa Barbara; new research suggests that the little blue pill for men may be able to stop menstrual cramps in women; and after making mice infertile, researchers in Australia think they may have the key to a male birth control pill.

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HIV Returns in Two Men Thought ‘Cured’ by Bone Marrow Transplants

The results suggest that HIV reservoirs, latent cells that have the genetic code of the virus, are more persistent and deeper in the body that scientists had thought.

Researchers in Boston announced last week that HIV had once again been detected in two patients who had previously been thought to be rid of the virus. The results suggest that HIV reservoirs, latent cells that have the genetic code of the virus, are more persistent and deeper in the body that scientists had thought.

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Condoms in Schools: A Smart Move, But a Tough Sell

Despite good research, myths about condoms leading to higher rates of sexual activity persist.

A local television station asked San Antonio parents how they felt about the American Academy of Pediactrics’ new suggestion that schools make condoms available to students. The results suggest that despite good research, myths about condoms leading to higher rates of sexual activity persist.

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Study Finds High Rates of Condom Use Among College Women Having Intercourse Irrespective of Alchohol Use

When it comes to condom use, a new study finds that expectations of what alcohol might do and partner type have much more to do with women’s decisions than whether they were drinking or even how much they drank.

When it comes to condom use, a new study finds that expectations of what alcohol might do and partner type have much more to do with women’s decisions than whether they were drinking or even how much they drank.

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Could New Steubenville Indictments Send a Message to Communities About Dealing With Rape?

Texas' omnibus anti-abortion law goes on trial again this morning in New Orleans.

Four more adults were indicted Monday for what they did—or didn’t do—after the rape of a 16-year-old girl last August. It will be interesting to see if going after the adults who facilitate these situations will be the lesson that communities need to start paying attention to our nation’s rape problem.

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This Week in Sex: Meningitis at Princeton, the Cheneys’ Public Dispute, and Herpes on a Library Book

(From left) Liz and Mary Cheney.

This week, Princeton University deals with an outbreak of meningitis, former VP Dick Cheney makes a public statement as his daughters disagree publicly over the legalization of same-sex marriage, and a scientist finds herpes on a library copy of Fifty Shades of Grey.

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Encourage Breastfeeding, But Please, Don’t Make Women Feel Like Failures

A new program in the UK is making waves for offering financial incentives to women who breastfeed exclusively for six months. Do programs like this really encourage breastfeeding, or do they just end up making women who have trouble nursing feel like failures?

A new program in the UK is making waves for offering financial incentives to women who breastfeed exclusively for six months. Do programs like this really encourage breastfeeding, or do they just end up making women who have trouble nursing feel like failures?

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New Device to Protect Against Pregnancy, Herpes, and HIV Is Possible

A new vaginal ring just entering human trials would release both levonorgestrel, a hormonal contraceptive, and tenofovir, an antiretroviral that has been shown to inhibit the replication of HIV and herpes simplex virus-2.

A new vaginal ring just entering human trials would release both levonorgestrel, a hormonal contraceptive, and tenofovir, an antiretroviral that has been shown to inhibit the replication of HIV and herpes simplex virus-2.

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Study: Mentorship by Black Teachers Can Reduce Unintended Pregnancies Among Black Teens

The study's authors based their hypothesis on previous research on representative bureaucracy, which has found that when agencies that serve women and minorities employ individuals from these groups in higher numbers, their clients benefit.

The study’s authors based their hypothesis on previous research on representative bureaucracy, which has found that when agencies that serve women and minorities employ individuals from these groups in higher numbers, their clients benefit.

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