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This Week in Sex: Prostate Cancer Sexually Transmitted? And State STI Rankings

Harvey Milk, circa 1978.

This week, a new study presents evidence that the parasite that causes trich might lead to prostate cancer, a new list shows the best and worst states for STIs, a Gallup poll shows the most support ever for same-sex marriage, and gay rights activist Harvey Milk is honored with a stamp.

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Louisiana Legislature Continues to Restrict Sex Education

In three separate votes in the last two weeks, the Louisiana legislature has decided to stick to its brand of restrictive sex education despite having higher than average teen pregnancy and birth rates and alarmingly high rates of HIV diagnosis in young people.

In three separate votes in the last two weeks, the Louisiana legislature has decided to stick to its brand of restrictive sex education despite having higher than average teen pregnancy and birth rates and alarmingly high rates of HIV diagnosis in young people.

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HPV May Be Even More Common Than Previously Thought

3D rendition of the human papillomavirus.

A new DNA study found that more than two-thirds of healthy Americans have one or more strains of human papillomavirus in their skin, vagina, mouth, or gut. Researchers, however, insist that people should not overreact to these findings “until the harm or benefit of most of these strains becomes apparent.”

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South Carolina Senate Committee Approves HPV Vaccine Bill, Amid Opposition

The South Carolina Senate Medical Affairs Committee passed a bill on Thursday that would allow—but not require—the state to create brochures about the HPV vaccine and provide vaccines to underinsured seventh graders. The bill, however, faces opposition, including from the governor.

The South Carolina Senate Medical Affairs Committee passed a bill on Thursday that would allow—but not require—the state to create brochures about the HPV vaccine and provide vaccines to underinsured seventh graders. The bill, however, faces opposition, including from the governor.

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Study: Rates of Cervical Cancer in the United States Higher Than Previously Thought

About 12,000 women in the United States get cervical cancer each year.

About 12,000 women in the United States get cervical cancer each year. While this number has not gone up, researchers have recalculated the rate of cervical cancer in the country and found that it’s higher than we thought, with some groups at much higher risk than previously believed.

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The NYPD Finally Changes Condoms-as-Evidence Policy, But Leaves Giant Loophole

In the wake of public pressure and impending legislative action, the NYPD has finally changed its policy of allowing officers to seize condoms as evidence of prostitution.

In the wake of public pressure and impending legislative action, the NYPD has finally changed its policy of allowing officers to seize condoms as evidence of prostitution. But the revised policy contains a loophole that advocates fear will continue to inhibit condom use.

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Brown University Takes on Sexual Assault… Again

Brown University

Administrators at the Ivy League school are scrambling to deal with negative publicity stemming from the mishandling of a sexual assault case—just as they did in the early ’90s, when the university made promises to improve its practices surrounding cases of sexual assault. It’s been 25 years; has Brown not made any progress?

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This Week in Sex: Sex Ed, Condom Dispensers, and Sex With Robots

The nation's sixth largest school district has adopted a comprehensive sex ed program.

This week, the nation’s sixth largest school district adopts a comprehensive sex ed program, college students design condom dispensers for Chicago high schools, an attempt to ban a puberty book fails, and a study finds one in five people would have sex with a robot (or at least not scoff at someone who did).

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Why on Earth Did the Las Vegas Police Department Sponsor an Event on Premarital Sex?

A scene from the Toe Tag Monologues

A presentation that took place this past weekend in Las Vegas may represent the all-time worst use of fear to promote chastity. It told its audience in no uncertain terms that premarital sex will lead to prostitution, sex trafficking, drug abuse, and death.

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This Week in Sex: New York Takes on Condoms-as-Evidence, and the FDA Approves New Use for HPV Test

New York state lawmakers are taking on the policy of using condoms as evidence of prostitution.

This week, New York state lawmakers took on a policy of using condoms as evidence of prostitution, a plan to sell condoms in middle and high schools in China met some skepticism, and the FDA approved a panel suggestion about HPV test. Plus, happy Masturbation Month!

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