· · · · · 

Coleman v. Court of Appeals of Maryland: A Warning to Women

This week the U.S. Supreme Court held that states cannot be sued for denying workers sick leave. The majority opinion handing down on Tuesday should be a warning to women: the Supreme Court most definitely does not have our backs.

· · · · · 

Women CAN Earn More Than Men – But Only In One Industry. Porn.

This month, one of Belgium’s women’s rights organizations, zij-kant, caused quite a stir with their annual “Equal Pay Day” message. Instead of merely high-lighting that women in Belgium, on average, earn 22 percent less than men, the organization launched a video starring porn actress Sasha Grey with the message “Porn is about the only way women can earn more than men—find a better alternative.”

· · · · · 

Limbaugh is Sorry for Calling Fluke a “Slut,” But Why Were We ALL Sorry, Too?

This week’s back-and-forth over Rush Limbaugh’s use of the words “slut” and “prostitute” illustrates our deep discomfort with women’s sexuality.

· · · · · 

When It Comes to Eating Disorders, Do We as a Society Know What We’re Dealing With?

The point is that the perfection those suffering from eating disorders are longing for in themselves in most cases is neither physical nor real. We will need to overcome our societal inability to see errors for what they are—an opportunity to learn—if we want to deal with eating disorders.

· · · · · 

Sensationalizing Drug Use in Pregnant Women: How the Media Perpetuates Racist and Ineffective Policies

The prosecution of drug use in pregnant women does nothing to fulfill a legitimate policy goal and in fact seems to be racially motivated—at least in the implementation—rather than spurred by a concern for children.

· · · · · 

New Pornography Regulations In LA: Are They Addressing the Right Problem?

On January 25, the mayor of Los Angeles signed regulation that requires the use of condoms by all performers in adult movies filmed within the city’s borders. Public health advocates have unsurprisingly celebrated the regulation, but there are some reasons why the ordinance may not be as effective as one might hope.

· · · · · 

The Problematic Framing of Abortion as an Issue of Privacy

One key reason for the success of state legislatures in restricting women’s right to choose might be that the fight over abortion in the United States historically has been framed as an issue of privacy. And the right to privacy offers poor protection for what is also an issue of life, health, and—above all—discrimination.

· · · · · 

Race, Class and Justice in the U.S. Legal System: Still A Long Way From the Promised Land

Race, class, ethnicity, and sex still determine, to a great degree, how justice is dispensed and whether people are treated justly by the United States legal system.  Recent news stories and hard data show just how far we remain from Martin Luther King’s “promised land.”

· · · · · 

The Deeply Rooted Parallels Between Female Genital Mutilation and Breast Implantation

Female genital mutilation and breast implantation tools

FGM is often justified with direct reference to fixed gender roles, how women “should” be and the possibilities for financial security FGM supposedly affords. Breast augmentation surgery is carried out for similar reasons with similar risks and results. Both interventions have no discernible health benefits and have potentially negative impact on women’s sexual health, as well as a number of other potential serious health effects. How can we stop them?

· · · · · 

Americans Demonstrate Changed Attitudes Towards Poverty Since the 2008 Economic Crisis

[img src]

Since household income has been declining over time (and proportionally fewer individuals earn more than twice the poverty level), the silver lining of the 2008 economic crisis might be that more Americans start seeing poverty for what it is: not something anyone “deserves.” 

· · · · ·