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Responding to the Arrests of Pregnant Women in Alabama

Amanda K. was six months pregnant and went into early labor with a prolapsed umbilical cord. She went to a local hospital for care where she underwent emergency surgery, but unfortunately her son soon died. But, rather than providing the support and compassionate care she and her family needed, the hospital drug tested her. The positive result was used as a basis for reporting her to the police and having her arrested for the crime of “chemical endangerment” of a child.

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Victory in Kentucky Supreme Court!

I am thrilled to let you know that the Kentucky Supreme Court once again refused to advance the war on drugs to women’s wombs and made clear that pregnant women, no less than other persons, are protected by the rule of law.

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Drugs, Pregnancy and Parenting Part II: April 29, 2010

Across the country, politicians continue to use medical misinformation about drugs, pregnant women, and parents to justify new punitive laws and counterproductive state actions. On April 29, 2010, National Advocates for Pregnant Women, with New York University’s School of Law, and the NYU Silver School of Social Work will be hosting its second continuing education program to address the myths and misinformation that too often influence public policies concerning drug use, pregnant women and parents.

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Arresting Pregnant Women is Bad for Babies: Kentucky Case Progresses and Advocates Speak Out

Tomorrow, the Kentucky Supreme Court will hear a case involving prosecution of a pregnant, drug-using woman. The case has broad implications for women’s rights in pregnancy and advocates for pregnant women are concerned.

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Advocates Unite to Oppose Criminalization of Being Pregnant

More than 50 organizations and experts in the fields of medicine, public health, and child welfare asked the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals to reject the state’s decision to incarcerate Amber Lovill because she was pregnant.

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