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Egg Freezing: Empowering, or Are We On Thin Ice?

A woman in her twenties who doesn’t want to have a baby yet is fine with us, but a woman in her late thirties seems to be a different story.

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Philippines Government Pursues Feeble Family Planning Strategy

The Philippines government is championing a form of family planning used by only one percent of women interested in planning their families.

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Catholic Aid Organization’s Subversive Support of Latin Americans

Tolerance, apparently, is Enemy Number 1, especially in places where the Catholic Church’s sphere of social and political influence is intact, but waning.

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Alaska Ballot Initiative Targets Minors

For some girls, parental notification is not an option. Self-induced abortion is.

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TV Land: A World Without Choice

Abortion’s absence from TV shows is hard to swallow when television has always been a medium for discussing social issues.

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Anti-Plan B-ers Shoot Themselves in the Foot

The real divide in the debate over EC is between those who support the well-being of teenage girls, and those who pursue an anti-choice and anti-contraception agenda so inflexible that it hinders its own aims.

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Choice, Palin Style

Palin has unintentionally demonstrated that there’s a way in which a pro-choice world honors the decision to carry an unplanned pregnancy more than a world without choice does.

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The Blood on Tony Perkins’s Hands

With such a lurid attack on Sebelius, Perkins had better be ready to explain his own complicity in AIDS deaths, not just in Africa but all over the world.

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Kansas Politicians Disgrace the Legislative Process

If this Senate bill becomes law, anti-choice virulence will not only be found in the political climate or on the sidewalk outside the clinic — it will have entered the supposedly neutral examining room.

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The Conscience Clause: What Would Hobbes Do?

Stanley Fish applies philosophy to the Provider Conscience Rule debate. He points out that Hobbes’s definition of “conscience” was almost exactly the opposite of the way we think of the word today. Hobbes looked to the word’s etymology—“to know in concert with one another”—to reason that the word could refer to public or common knowledge.

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