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Enough Is Enough: Repeal Hyde Now

As we acknowledge the passage of Hyde 38 years ago this month, it is important to look at how the amendment helped to usher in a wave of anti-choice legislation that has the most detrimental impacts on poor communities of color—especially in states like Mississippi.

As we acknowledge the passage of Hyde 38 years ago this month, it is important to look at how the amendment helped to usher in a wave of anti-choice legislation that has the most detrimental impacts on poor communities of color—especially in states like Mississippi.

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What Happened to the ‘Affordable’ Part of the Affordable Care Act?

Increasing access to health insurance should not come at the expense of exploiting young and poor Americans. We need additional federal health insurance options that are supported by public officials who care about the health and prosperity of their constituents.

Increasing access to health insurance should not come at the expense of exploiting young and poor Americans. We need additional federal health insurance options that are supported by public officials who care about the health and prosperity of their constituents.

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The 50th Anniversary of Mississippi’s Freedom Summer: Remembering What Fannie Lou Hamer Taught Us

Fannie Lou Hamer  used the power of storytelling to compel America to recognize the humanity of poor Black people in Mississippi.

Modern Mississippi freedom fighters must remain committed to Hamer’s legacy of bridging voting and reproductive rights into a comprehensive reproductive justice effort to protect Black women and other populations that are vulnerable to violations of both.

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Cost, Inequality, and Misinformation: Why Generic Emergency Contraception Is Still Inaccessible for Many

There are still barriers to EC access, especially for women and teens of color who disproportionately live in poor and segregated neighborhoods.

Though the FDA decision to permit generic EC pill manufacturers to sell their products over the counter represents a gain for those with the most access to resources, ultimately the decision reflects pharmaceutical manufacturing companies’ interests, rather than the lives of those most adversely affected by lack of access to EC.

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The Politics of Fat and Emergency Contraceptives

Once again, politics have trumped science, and it’s women and girls who pay the price.

It was reported recently that French drug manufacturer HRA Pharma had found that the emergency contraceptive Norlevo, which has a similar chemical makeup to Plan B One-Step, is ineffective for women over 176 pounds. Here’s why I was not surprised.

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Fannie Lou Hamer and Her Dream for Jobs and Freedom

Fannie Lou Hamer speaks at the Democratic National Convention on August 22, 1964, at the Credentials Committee.

In an era when people across the country are asking, “Where are the Black women leaders?” activists like Fannie Lou Hamer serve as a reminder of how many rural Black women have always been strong leaders.

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Michelle Obama Should Be Brave: Black Women and Reproductive Health Disparities in the 2012 Presidential Election

Though choice is a significant part of gaining gender equality, I remain struck by how our First Lady, a black woman with black daughters, has yet to talk about reproductive health as broader than “choice.”

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Saving The Boobies Will Not Save Me

Pink ribbons do not help bring awareness to the socioeconomic inequities connected to breast cancer; they commodify the disease and make it “sexy” under the guise of raising awareness.

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