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Demographic Security and the CIA

CIA Director Gen. Michael Hayden recently identified population growth as one of three top destabilizing trends currently facing the world.

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Complex Demographic Impact of HIV/AIDS

Despite the major effects of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on mortality and life expectancy, populations are continuing to grow even in the hardest-hit countries. With so much uncertainty about the number of people living with HIV/AIDS, the demographic impact is still incompletely understood.

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The Shape of Things to Come: Why Age Structure Matters To a Safer, More Equitable World

Elizabeth Leahy is a Reseach Assistant at Population Action International (PAI) and lead author of "The Shape of Things to Come: Why Age Structure Matters To a Safer, More Equitable World" which is being released today.

As the lead author of PAI's new report "The Shape of Things to Come: Why Age Structure Matters to a Safer, More Equitable World," I was interested to read Eesha Pandit's recent blog post about an article profiling the report appearing last week in The New York Times. I am glad that Ms. Pandit is considering the complexities of the linkages between youthful populations and civil conflict. However, she based her analysis on a single news article that covered one aspect of what is a complex, multi-faceted piece.

The report aims to provide valuable new insights into the programs and investments that can make countries "healthier"—more peaceful, more democratic, and better able to provide for the needs of their citizens. Far from "scapegoating young people…for the problems of developing nations," youth are a tremendous asset for any society, especially if they are educated, healthy, and living in a safe and equitable world. PAI's report shows why investments in programs that respond to their needs are so important.

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