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Empty Promises? The G8 and Africa

The Group of Eight (G8) summit was held last week in Germany; on the last day the member nations met with African leaders to address HIV/AIDS.

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Live From SisterSong: Reproductive Justice For All

Youth leadership, global justice and sex-positivity are just some of the issues that power a broad-based reproductive justice movement envisioned and experienced at the Sistersong Conference.

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Live From SisterSong: Let’s Talk About Sex!

The SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Health Collective's second national conference started yesterday; Eesha Pandit shares highlights from the four-day reproductive justice bonanza.

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Mind the Gap: Racial Health Disparities

Access to health care in the United States is influenced by more than just economic factors; studies show that race may decide whether it's possible to lead a healthy lifestyle.

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New Hope for Young Ugandan Mothers

A Ugandan organization is rehabilitating child mothers below 16 years of age by giving them a goat and enrolling them in either job training or school.

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Violence Against Indigenous Women

Amnesty International's report on sexual violence against Native American and Alaskan Native women reveals that these women are stuck in a maze of injustice.

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Chinese Activist’s Struggle for Human Rights

Mao Hengfeng continues to speak out against China's restrictive one-child policy, despite harassment and arrest. Her incredible story is one for the books.

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Biologically Determined: Indian Women Required to Reveal Details of Their Menstrual Cycles

After significant outrage by women civil servants in India, the Indian government says it will review new appraisal forms requiring female civil servants to offer information about their menstrual cycles.

Last week, the BBC reported that the health ministry of the Indian Government sought information about the details of female employees' menstrual cycles and when they last sought maternity leave. The offending questions are after the jump.

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Young People Make Strife: Problems with the Youth Bulge Theory

An article in last week's New York Times discusses a study recently published by Population Action International (PAI) which suggests that,

… it is no simple coincidence that 80 percent of the civil conflicts that broke out in the 1970s, '80s and '90s occurred in countries where at least 60 percent of the population was under 30, and that almost 9 of 10 such youthful countries had autocratic rulers or weak democracies.

The PAI study finds one thing that is consistent among strife-ridden nations like Iraq, Afghanistan, Sudan and Congo is that they all have very young populations.

William L. Nash, a retired Army major general who directs the Center for Preventive Action of the Council on Foreign Relations, says: "You've got a lot of young men. You've got a lot of poverty. You've got a lot of bad governance, and often you've got greed with extractive industries. You put all that together, and you've got the makings of trouble."

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Dispatches from the Revolution: Part 3

In the third and final installment of my coverage of From Abortion Rights to Social Justice: Building a Movement for Reproductive Freedom, a conference hosted by the Civil Liberties and Public Policy Program (CLPP), I had the opportunity to sit down with Shana Griffin. Shana works with INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence and is the Interim Director of the Women's Health and Justice Initiative in New Orleans.

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