Legal Wrap: Police Brutality Is a Reproductive Justice Issue


Legal Wrap is a weekly round-up of key legal reproductive rights and justice news.

The horrifying events unfolding in Ferguson, Missouri, following the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown, a Black unarmed teenager, are a tragic reminder of why police violence in our communities is a reproductive justice issue and one that advocates cannot afford to stay silent on any longer.

Whatever you read on Ferguson and police violence, do not skip this piece by Brittney Cooper.

In related news, a new report details how pervasive racial discrimination severely undermines Black women’s health outcomes.

Erin Matson has this great read on the next “religious freedom” debate: using tax dollars to discriminate in adoption.

Texas governor and abortion rights foe Rick Perry was indicted last week on felony corruption and bribery charges. Andrea Grimes has the latest here.

A Pennsylvania woman is being jailed for having a stillbirth, according to advocates from the National Advocates for Pregnant Women.

Meanwhile, the fate of two Pennsylvania buffer zones is in doubt following the Supreme Court’s ruling in McCullen v. Coakley.

An Ohio judge ruled that a Cincinnati abortion provider will have to close because the court lacks the jurisdiction to overturn a state agency decision to revoke the clinic’s license.

Anti-choice lawmakers in Mississippi have asked the entire U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit to hear their appeal of a decision blocking enforcement of the state’s hospital admitting privileges requirement for abortion providers.

Elsewhere, in Texas a judge heard arguments in the latest challenge to Texas’ targeted regulation of abortion providers (TRAP) law. RH Reality Check‘s coverage of the trial can be found here.

What’s an important public health tool in fighting the spread of HIV? Decriminalizing sex work.

Parental consent and notification laws are among the most pernicious anti-choice regulations, as this must-read piece explains.

The Supreme Court will likely take up marriage equality sometime next term, but this piece in the Washington Post argues the issue was actually decided more than 40 years ago.

It’s been a heavy news cycle, so let’s end on some good news: Oregon officials added transgender procedures to those covered by state-provided health insurance plans.

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