‘Childless’ or ‘Childfree’: The Difference Matters


Mother’s Day is a great time to remind ourselves that language matters. We already know this; the difference between a “baby” and a “fetus,” between “reproductive rights” and “reproductive justice,” among other terms, are vital to pro-choice politics and the movement. Corporate media outlets misfire with regard to language all the time, and this has created a deep sense of confusion between the terms “childless” and “childfree.”

Recently, in a piece for The Telegraph, writer Sarah Rainey featured actress Helen Mirren discussing her decision to not have children, and the implications of that decision for Mirren and for other women like her in a society obsessed with having children.

“Motherhood holds no interest for me,” said Mirren.

She is referred to in Rainey’s piece as “childless.”

Here’s the problem: While “childless” means the condition of being without children, it implies that everyone who does not have children would like to have them. However, being “childfree,” like Mirren—and like me—means that one does not want to have children at all.

The implications of using these two terms interchangeably reach beyond celebrities, of course. People (not just women) can be childless for a lot of reasons—reproductive and financial challenges among them—but, like being childfree and not wanting kids, it’s a deeply stigmatized experience, accompanied by shame. Both groups of people are in search of a community, and finding that can be incredibly difficult, particularly when you might be looking in the wrong place.

A few months ago, as part of my own perpetual search for other childfree folks, I was doing research for a piece about female clergy who are childfree. As I was looking for people to interview, I was sent down a tricky path. You could practically hear the whispering through Gchat when people I had reached out to said, “Rabbi ___ doesn’t have kids, but I don’t know why.” So the woman could be childfree, or maybe she wasn’t interested in having kids or didn’t feel ready yet, or maybe she was dealing with some painful circumstances that I would provoke if I asked her to talk about it.

While it’s somehow become socially acceptable to ask everyone you come across if they have children, and if not, why, that doesn’t make it easier to disclose a complicated answer, which everyone has to a certain degree. If you’re not physically able to or interested in having biological children and you’ve adopted, or are pursuing adoption, there’s a landmine of potentially insensitive comments, from inappropriate mentions of race to the classic “Don’t you want a child who’s ‘really’ yours?” Miscarriage and other reproductive challenges are incredibly common—up to 25 percent of clinically recognized pregnancies end in miscarriage. Often, these things are not talked about because of shame and stigma surrounding miscarriage and other reproductive issues.

In the end, the best way to go about my search was to be clear about language, defining childfree from the get-go and trying my best to assure people that I was a safe person to talk to. I said things like, “I’m like you,” “I don’t think you’re an alien because you don’t want to have a baby,” “I get it,” and “You can trust me.”

The taboo that surrounds women without children, childless or childfree, is potent. We spend a lot of time explaining ourselves (or avoiding explaining ourselves) and looking for people who understand us, who don’t ask us to or expect us to explain. But at the same time, the difference between childless and childfree folks is important to take note of and apply correctly, because we are not, in fact, the same. As a woman who’s childfree, I’m not experiencing reproductive challenges. I’m not waiting for the right partner, or enough money, or the perfect geographic location. I don’t feel like something is missing from my life because I don’t have children. I don’t want to have kids. There is no yet.

That might be hard to swallow, for some—childfree folks constantly hear things like, “You’ll change your mind” and “You’ll regret it.”

Perhaps, because it’s still so unfathomable to the world that a woman wouldn’t want a baby, the term is deliberately misunderstood. If we keep confusing the language, the thinking may go, we can deny that childfree women exist.

The experience of not wanting children in a world where women are defined by their reproductive desire and potential—where women are expected to structure their lives around babies—is very different than being a woman who would like a baby or would like to be a parent some day. That difference has to do with desire. If you’re a cisgender, heterosexual woman—especially a white woman—who doesn’t have a kid but wants one, you’re still in line with expectations about how a woman should behave. You’re not threatening, you’re adhering. A cisgender, straight woman who doesn’t want a baby is transgressive, subversive, pathological, a perpetual mystery to be solved.

Things may be different, of course, if you’re queer, trans, single, poor, or a person of color; as a society, we’re pretty clear on who we want to be having babies.

We have to believe each other when we say what we do and do not want, and trust that we know ourselves well enough to make choices that are true for us. And we have to support one another through less than lovely times, and through experiences that are challenged and marginalized. Part of supporting each other means we hold media outlets accountable when they confuse and mislabel our experiences, whether purposefully or not.

Both childfree and childless folks need a community of people like them. But in order to do find that community, it needs to be made clear that we are in search of separate things. To get what we need, both terms—childless and childfree—must be de-stigmatized, and we have to understand that they are different, and have separate and distinct implications in our society.

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  • Telecat

    I am childfree. Calling me childless is asking for a loud, obscenity-laced argument.

  • Mindy McIndy

    I am childfree, and am happy to be married to a woman who wants to remain childfree as well. I like having excess income. I like being able to pick up and travel to wherever I want and only have to worry about who will feed the cats and scoop their poop. I like not having to worry about school for the kids, or take care of them when they’re sick, or possibly pass on my horrible genetic disorder and family history of mental illness. I like the freedom of it being just me and my wife. She is all I need to feel fulfilled and happy in this world.

    • Ella Warnock

      I think many are frightened by that kind of freedom.

  • Suba gunawardana

    Certainly a difference that matters.

    Furthermore, I’m sure that having children when you don’t want them is far worse than not having children when you want them.

    • fiona64

      It sure as hell is for the children …

  • purrtriarchy

    Funny how if you have 12 kids people think you are a saint, but if you don’t breed you are labelled a selfish Nazi.

    • AmyE

      Where I live if it’s not two.five (2-3), you’re trouble. No children and in a relationship and people suspect your relationship is suffering. More than three children you’re a “breeder.” (If white, you’re a teabagger. If black, you’re a welfare drainer.) And then there’s same s3x couples, one-parent families, mixed racial families… seriously, people need to quit judging on first impressions. I’ve heard some of the meanest things said and somehow it always seems to get around to welfare. “Look at her and her kids. One’s black, one’s white, one’s Asian. I bet they’re all on welfare.” Sorry, rant over, but seriously it’s not all white-picket fence, people. I mean, I’m in California. I expect better.

      • purrtriarchy

        People are judgmental assholes.

      • redlemon

        And if you have one, people question how that one child will feel lonely or missing out on the fun of siblings and won’t grow up “properly” socialized.

        • AmyE

          Oops, left single child families out. Yeah, same there.

          • redlemon

            It’s almost like women can’t win unless they fit into a narrow box of other people’s expectations!

          • LostInUnderland

            Women can’t win. Period. I do understand the stigma childfree women go through. My best friend is childfree and I love her just as she is. However, in my opinion, the women who give childfree women **** over their choice are just upset that they can’t criticize that person’s each and every parenting choice and gloat over every parenting fail. There isn’t a box narrow enough that another woman won’t climb in it to beat up the women trying to fit it.

        • Dez

          My mom had my younger brother for the same reason. Funny thing is that I can’t stand him even now that we are grown. We never connected and wouldn’t have anything to do with him if he wasn’t related to me. I would have rather been an only child. These expectations of women have consequences for their children as well.

          • redlemon

            My brother and I never got along when we were younger. The first time we started getting along was when my youngest brother was born, 14 years younger than me and 10 younger than my other brother. We both came to a sort of understanding that we held a power of influence: two teenagers and a toddler. There were a bunch of other factors, but the point is that we have a relationship now, but we’re anything but close knit. We’re very different people who just happen to watch out for each other. Did we socialize each other when we were younger? If you call screaming “Get out of my room!” socialization, then yes.

          • fiona64

            Don’t feel like you’re alone; I loathe my brother.

          • purrtriarchy

            So I see that you were tone trolled on LJF.

            MWB is a good poster, but, he tends to be a bit extreme in his PC policing of werdz.

            Check this thread out:

            http://www.patheos.com/blogs/lovejoyfeminism/2014/04/upworthy-duke-and-ableist-slurs.html

            They basically go down a fucking rabbit hole, where *every* word that is remotely critical can be misconstrued as ‘ableist’. It’s ridiculous.

          • fiona64

            I think I let him know just what I thought of his tone policing, LOL.

      • lady_black

        Wow. It would never occur to people who see a woman with a white child, a black child and an Asian child that they are foster children or adopted?

        • AmyE

          Well, I usually think foster, but that’s because I know a couple that has a lot of children. There are a lot of people where I live that get married multiple times and have children each time. I don’t think it’s a bad thing, but for some reason there’s a stigma involved with that.

          • lady_black

            My sister’s ex has a beautiful black adopted little girl with his second wife. To me, it just seemed normal. They can’t have their own so they adopted a child. I never thought about anyone judging them for it.

  • blfdjlj

    Well, for the nation to survive, people must have many children. Otherwise, the population will age even faster, and Social Security/Medicare will have to be cut drastically whether you like it or not (and today’s proposals of Chained CPI will seem as a minor technicality).

    The point is how to convince women to have more children. Restricting access to birth control/abortion is clearly not the way, as virtually every study has shown. IMO workplace flexibility could be key.

    • Dez

      Women shouldn’t not be encouraged to be brood mares to keep the population up. That reduces us to breeding machines and not people with their own hopes and dreams. I am not obligated to have children for my country. Maybe you should work on men taking responsibility for the children that exist now before convincing women to have more children. I see you forgot to mention men in your comment.

      • blfdjlj

        Men are obviously part of the solution as well, taking care of children (my reference to workplace flexibility includes them too).

        • Dez

          Then we should work on men first before trying to “convince” women to have more children. So far men have not done their responsibility with all the single mothers out there. Plus fair wages, health insurance, day care, further education and tons of other issues that affect women should be addressed before low birth rates.

    • Suba gunawardana

      Creating MORE people is absolutely not the solution, when we can’t even take care of the existing people.

      • blfdjlj

        Let’s cut social security today then. With low birth rates this program is unaffordable.

        • Suba gunawardana

          First, low birth rates does not equate low birth numbers. The population only keeps going UP, never down. Thus there’s no real need to increase birth rates.

          Second, having more children is no guarantee that they would be productive citizens who contribute to social security. They could just as well be that many more mouths to feed. In other words, exacerbating the problem rather than providing a solution.

          • Arekushieru

            Okay, Suba, I know I have been disagreeing with you a lot, lately, so this time around I want to express just how wholeheartedly I DO agree with you! This is why the Overpopulation ‘Myth’ Busters seriously annoy me. They always use the excuse of lower birth rates as ‘proof’ that overpopulation isn’t happening. Which means that they have seriously failed at math and economics. After all, if a community starts out with a population of five thousand with a birth rate of at least four times what would be needed to maintain replacement levels, then the population exploded to 10 million with a birth rate at replacement levels, more children would be born simply because there are more people. Seriously, forced-birthers make me want to puke.

        • lady_black

          Bullshit.

        • Shan

          That’s a hidebound answer to a very narrowly viewed problem.

        • LostInUnderland

          Then I hope you are pregnant right now and making sure that your other 3+ kids are getting the training they need to be productive citizens. If you think more children should be born, then have them, but don’t expect anyone else to have them just because YOU think they should.

    • Ella Warnock

      I think workplace flexibility would be great for everybody, but it wouldn’t have convinced me to have kids. Nothing would have, hence the term ‘childfree.’

    • lady_black

      There are many other ways of keeping Social Security liquid. Whether you like it or not. And women are not drooling idiots to be “convinced” to do your bidding. Again, whether you like it or not.

      • blfdjlj

        Ok, please find out what happens to countries with dramatically low birth rates. There are some real-live examples here, so it shouldn’t be too hard to find them. And don’t complain if a much drastic version of this gets enacted: http://budget.house.gov/uploadedfiles/fy15_blueprint.pdf

        • lady_black

          We do not have “dramatically low birth rates.”

        • Arekushieru

          Even if we do have low birth rates, convincing women to have more children is simply pushing all the responsibility to clean up the mess created by the wealthy elite onto the backs of women. No. Just no.

    • Shan

      “The point is how to convince women to have more children.”

      There are so many wrong assumptions here, I hardly know where to begin. You make it sound like women ought to be breeding for the state, to help support the elderly population, as if a) that’s the only useful contribution women can make and b) that’s the only solution to the problem.

      • blfdjlj

        Well, there is another solution to the problem, and it’s cutting SS/Medicare benefits by a large margin. Would you prefer that?

        • lady_black

          I’d prefer lifting the caps. Or removing them entirely.

          • blfdjlj

            The caps exist so that SS does not have to pay excessive benefits to very wealthy individuals. Without the cap, millionaires would have to receive much larger benefits. The problems of SS could be solved through a combination of chained CPI, a higher retirement age and personal accounts. Today people think that the way SS works is that you pay in money and get it back when you’re older, but instead the way it is is that today’s young pay for the old. Personal accounts would change that.

          • lady_black

            Who says millionaires would have to receive excessive benefits? I said raise the caps, not raise the maximum payout. If you raise the retirement age, you’re just going to get more people on disability. Not everyone works the kind of job you can do until age 70. What you are discussing is a type of Ponzi scheme where the government is the main beneficiary. And stop babbling about “personal accounts.” Were you sleeping when the economy crashed? I wasn’t. I work with older people who lost a good bit of their considerable nest eggs. You want Wall Street to have total control over them. What a useful idiot and a tool you are.

          • Suba gunawardana

            How about raising the cap on contributions but putting a cap on the benefits?

          • LostInUnderland

            The problem of SS could be simply solved by making those whose net worth is 1M+ ineligible.

          • blfdjlj

            So people earning 1M+ would not pay into SS or receive anything from it?

          • LostInUnderland

            Exactly

        • JamieHaman

          lol, you are acting like there are only two possible solutions to a problem we don’t actually have.
          Social Security would be paid up if the cap on taxable earning were lifted. If paying your fair share is too much trouble for you to undertake, I’m sorry for you. If we closed the tax loopholes that only serve the top 2% of the people, we would solve a lot of tax problems right there. If we required a living minimum wage, that would certainly solve more problems that it would create. Even Mitt Romney agrees it is past time it went up.

          • blfdjlj

            You can’t solve the economy’s problems on the back of the top 1%, because there simply aren’t enough millionaires and billionaires. SS will require serious reform, and it will be politically difficult. The minimum wage should be raised by sone amount, but throwing it up to $15 or some crazy level will cause more problems than it will solve.

          • JamieHaman

            You are full of it. Next you will say Reagan’s voodoo economics work for all the population, not just the top.
            Social Security does require lifting of the cap, and no, it won’t be easy with Paul Ryan “helping.”

          • LostInUnderland

            Then yes, get rid of SS and Medicare rather than trying to keep women as brood mares. Neither one of those programs is likely to ever do me as much good as constant pregnancies would do me harm.

        • Shan

          For starters, how about let’s not presume that women birthing more children in order to support SS/Medicare is in any way part of solving the problem, hm?

          • Cactus

            And what kind of work are these kids going to be doing anyway, eh? Before creating new large generations of humans we need a way of supporting them, and right now our country doesn’t have what we had in the 1950s and 1960s in terms of relatively well-paying jobs that didn’t require years and years of higher education. There’s no bloody way I’m bringing another human into this world if I’m not sure I’d be able to feed hir. Or if, as Jamie says below, the planet is already overstuffed. That’s a recipe for disaster. I’m childfree by choice, thanks.

    • JamieHaman

      That “must have many children” crap is how we run out of planet. Nope. There is another way. Could be going back to generational families in one house, could be 2 or 4 or more biologically unrelated people willing to share quarters in a home. Could be a million other alternatives than what you appear to be insisting on. Why should young women wreck their bodies and lives to support a huge baby boomer population, that has done incredibly stupid things to destroy the planet? ummm.

      • blfdjlj

        That would not save the problem. If birth rates were to fall, Paul Ryan’s Medicare plan would seem like an extremely modest proposal (cutting benefits only after 10 years). http://budget.house.gov/uploadedfiles/fy15_blueprint.pdf

        • purrtriarchy

          Immigration. Besides, once all the excess people die of old age, the population will stabilize.

          • blfdjlj

            That could be part of the solution too (along with higher birth rates and reform of Medicare/SS). There is no one magic solution to a vexing problem

          • lady_black

            No we do not need higher birth rates. And women do not want higher birth rates. There is a ridiculously low cap on SS taxes. Lift it.

          • JamieHaman

            There is no reason for you to expect a “one magic solution” to any problem involving people.
            Never going to happen.

        • JamieHaman

          Have to disagree, the birth rates for white amaericans seem to have fallen, (not going to look it up now) but the birth rates nationwide? We have more people and money than ever. Raise the taxes for Social Security.

        • LostInUnderland

          Seriously? I read that budget and it is FULL of seriously misguided policies/reasoning. Try a peer reviewed study and not an idiot politician’s talking points.

    • fiona64

      Why do I see shades of Lebensborn in this post?

    • John H

      The world population has more than doubled (3 billion to 7 billion) in fifty years, without serious encouragement (and with one of the most populous countries actively discouraging procreation). Basically no one NEEDS to have children in order to assure humans will not die out. As for your disturbing nationalism, eww.

  • http://paulaknight.wordpress.com/ Paula Knight

    I would be labelled as ‘childless’ but I’d rather not subscribe to any label that defines me in relation to my reproductive status. It’s important to make the distinction, though, if the words must be used – for example, as you say, to help find community. I wrote/ drew about it here (rather than write out my thoughts again): http://paulaknight.wordpress.com/2012/08/27/labels-childless-or-child-free/

  • Angela Monger

    I never married or had children because I just flat didn’t want to. Had no interest in either of these things. Mainly because I realized early on that you don’t have to be married or have children to be happy. I’ve never had anyone question my decisions I guess because I just live my life the way I feel like and I don’t volunteer a lot of information. However I do find it odd that people can’t handle the thought of women not wanting to marry or not wanting to have children or both. So much for freedom and all that jazz.

    • LostInUnderland

      LOL I am willing to bet you were not raised below the Mason-Dixon line. I can only imagine what it would be like to grow up in a place that didn’t consider a woman’s duty to marry and have kids. The pressures here are ridiculous in that regard.

    • Angela P. Woodrat

      Hi Angela–I am exactly the same, although a big reason I never wanted to have children was because there are more than enough humans on the planet. Nobody ever questions me about it either–they know how I feel.

  • Vibhav Mishra

    I Don’t think so because if You are a mother/father then and only then you can understand the importance of a child. By the way nice article
    Check out More on – http://www.ifathersday-2014.com

    • purrtriarchy

      Not necessarily some people have kids and hate it

    • Jennifer Starr

      Some people don’t have biological children but spend a lot of their time taking care of other people’s children. Like me. I don’t expect you to reply, though, since it seems as if you’re busy spamming your subpar Father’s Day site all over the internet. I hope you don’t get any hits.

    • Suba gunawardana

      Anyone who NEEDS to walk a mile in another’s shoes to know how they feel, have a serious deficiency of empathy.
      Not an uncommon problem among humankind, considering how horribly all non-humans are treated.

    • Arekushieru

      So, let’s apply your logic in reverse, then, shall we? If you are not a mother/father, then and only then you can understand the importance of NOT having a child. In fact, people can BE childfree precisely because they understand the importance of having and raising children. Kthx.

  • Dawn9476

    I don’t know how they are now but several years ago, I stumbled onto a childfree message board and the people there were pretty hateful towards family members and co-workers, who are parents. I don’t have any kids myself and thought this might be a good community to get involved with but a lot of them were just downright hateful towards people with kids.

    • Arekushieru

      I think you have it turned around, though. It’s the people with children who benefit more than those without. And, generally, having more privilege than others does not inspire much respect. Not doing anything to change the status quo is not an acceptable way to earn respect, either.

      • LostInUnderland

        How do people with children benefit? What is the benefit to having children?

        • Arekushieru

          Um, you seem to be contradicting yourself, here. Because you seem to agree with Suba that people should have some sort of child license before being permitted to have children. The fact that they don’t have to do that, clearly explains how having children is a benefit in society’s eyes.

          As for the comparison between childfree and having children, itself, please read pitbullgirl’s explanation, as well, thanks!

          • LostInUnderland

            Oh, I wasn’t clear. I was asking how parents benefit by having children. I was asking in what way children benefit parents. I see the benefit of someone to take care of you when you are old, but raising them brings more liabilities then benefits. It is worth it if you love them. Any sacrifice is worth it, but it is a stretch to imagine raising children as a personal benefit.

          • LostInUnderland

            I don’t see pitbull’s explanation. Above or below? I’m on phone browser so hard to find quickly. Thank you

    • pitbullgirl65

      And a lot of that is just venting. Parents are the ones bingoing the childfree so until I get respect for my decision (which has zero impact on their lives, while theirs’ does impact the environment) I fully support ranting.

  • http://bastardette.blogspot.com Marley Greiner

    I’m child free and I can’t stand kids. I mean, really can’t stand them. (Babies dont’ bother me, but once they’re up running around and talking, I’m out the door.. Hosever, I am one of the few people I know who actually like teenagers as a class.) The only tihng worse for me than kids are those who breed them. When i was a kid I didn’t like other kids. i preferred adult company for the most part. I view parenthood as a form of slavery. You’ll never get that kid out of your house and your bank account. A few years ago I spent a lot of time covering local militant anti-abort people. I’d tell them the same thing. Apparently they’d never met a woman who hated kids, but it shut them up when the discussion came around to that. My mom used to remind me, uyu were a child once.” Yeah, will so what. I outgrew it.

    • Cactus

      Yeah, I vacillate between agreeing with you 100% and thinking kids are awesome, but definitely not for me (depends on what kind of kids I’ve interacted with on any particular day). What is not up for debate, though, is the utter ridiculousness of people who want to badger people who think like you do, and who think like I sometimes do, to have kids. People who legitimately hate kids would make terrible parents. They need to give it a rest.

    • Ella Warnock

      Did you used to post on alt.support.childfree? Your name looks familiar.

      • http://bastardette.blogspot.com Marley Greiner

        Yes, I did. It made me realize how much I don’t like kids or parents! Your name looks familiar, too.

        • Ella Warnock

          It certainly helped stay the course that I was doing the correct thing for me. I was Sassinak back in the day.

  • BJ Survivor

    I rarely get any flak for being childfree. Where I live most people are sane. Most people tell me it’s a good thing that I know my own mind and that having children really isn’t for everyone. When that rare someone wonders if/claims I’ll regret not having children, I just reply “I’d rather regret a choice than regret a child.” I’ve known that I would not be creating children for 18 years now (since age 26), got a hysterectomy last year, and have absolutely zero regrets.

    • Suba gunawardana

      Very true. Abortion regret is only for oneself. Childbirth regret will have lasting repercussions for many people.

      • BJ Survivor

        Exactly. If my husband had wanted kids (well, I wouldn’t have married him in the first place), then divorce would be our only option. If he wanted kids and I wouldn’t do it, he would be unhappy. If I had a kid to placate him, 3 of us would be unhappy.

    • Ella Warnock

      What’s with this idiotic idea that ‘regret’ over an abortion OR not having kids is something that women just can’t handle and will OMGZ kill them and make them alcoholics and drug addicts and commit suicide and . . . oh gawd, pulease. Mature, adult people deal with regrets in a mature, adult manner. Regrets have exactly as much power as you allow them to have.

      • BJ Survivor

        I know, right? It boggles the mind. I just read an article on childfree women being refused and one (unfortunately female) doctor claimed that studies show that 7% of women regret getting sterilized, so she felt justified in refusing the procedure to childfree women. How infuriating. So because there are a few nitwits who regret their sterilizations, the vast majority of us must be refused a procedure that will ensure we will never have to run a gauntlet of bible-babbling loons to obtain a legal medical procedure.

  • Lacey

    I know what you mean – it’s expected, especially if you’re married, that you have kids or will soon. I don’t have kids – sort of both childless and childfree (have infertility problems, but don’t deep down see it as the end of the world if birth or adoption just doesn’t happen). But people ask all the time, especially when they hear I am/was married (going through a divorce) if I have kids and sometimes ask “why not” or “you’ll see – it’s the best thing in the world”. My ex thought I was selfish for not accepting that kids might not come – the idea is that raising a kid makes you normal and teaches you to put a kid first. But can’t you show appreciation of and do things for people who aren’t your kids? My mom says “At least childfree people know what they want and you don’t need kids to have a full life.”

  • terafied

    This is a linguistic/semantical preference issue. There is no official designation making “childless” mean wanting but not having children.

  • http://www.everupward.org Justine

    I disagree, I desperately wanted, tried, fought, and paid a lot for children. I consider myself childfree after two failed rounds of IVF with a gestational surrogate instead of childless because I have fought for my survival and recovery after infertility. Calling myself childless feels negative and like it doesn’t describe accurately where I’ve come from, I am technically a childfree mother. Thank you for this perspective, I enjoyed learning about it. Justine (www.everupward.org)

  • Rachel Barnes

    We (hubby and me) are childfree. Where we live we have been called all sorts of horrible things and met with the “Oh you will change your mind.” bit side eyed glance that I am sure all childfree peeps get from time to time. I don’t like it but then I just shrug and go about my day. I think of what we humans are doing to the Earth and I feel better I am not leaving generations to deal with such things as food insecurity and global warming.

    • Angela Monger

      Isn’t that stupid? No I am not going to change my damn mind. I’m not into changing nappies and getting up in the middle of the night. Ugh.