Where Is the Million Hoodie March for Renisha McBride?


It’s been two weeks since the unnecessary and untimely killing of Renisha McBride. On November 2, the unarmed 19-year-old who was in search for help after a car accident in the Detroit suburb of Dearborn Heights was shot in the face by Theodore Wafer, whose porch she had walked onto. The parallels between Trayvon Martin’s tragic killing and McBride’s are resonating in a national psyche rife with story after story of Black men and women gunned down as if their Black bodies have little or no value. And while we don’t know what will happen to Wafer as a result of the killing (George Zimmerman, the man who killed Martin, was acquitted) we know this pattern of violence must end.

Reports that have surfaced since the tragic killing note McBride was intoxicated at the time of the incident, implying that somehow she was responsible for her own death. McBride crashed into a parked car and walked a short distance to knock on Wafer’s door for help. Instead of, say, inviting her in to call 9-1-1 to report the car accident, he shot her in the face. Originally, Wafer claimed the shotgun fired accidentally, and he wasn’t arrested immediately after the shooting based on this version of events—reminiscent of the Zimmerman case.

Now that more evidence has surfaced, Wafer is claiming that he shot McBride in self-defense, even though the door to his home was locked and reports show that she was shot through this locked screen door and from a far enough distance that she didn’t pose an immediate threat. On Friday, Wafer was finally charged with second-degree murder and manslaughter and instructed to turn himself into the authorities. Wafer was arraigned, with his bail set at $250,000.

Beyond these facts, it appears McBride was killed in a manner more appropriate for a rabid animal trespassing on someone’s property than a human being with a full cadre of rights. Her life, like so many others in the Black community, was ended prematurely, for inexplicable reasons that defy logic about self-defense, guns, racial discrimination, and the criminalization of Black bodies.

This narrative is all too familiar. Zimmerman made similar claims after the killing of Trayvon Martin in 2011. Zimmerman claimed Martin posed a threat to his community, in part because Martin was wearing a hoodie. Zimmerman claimed that Martin—who was “armed” with Skittles and an iced tea—was a threat because he didn’t respond to being followed by a strange man, with the “yes, sir” head down humility expected by Black people being interrogated by those who believe they are somewhere they are not permitted to be. Martin’s death and the failure to immediately arrest Zimmerman caused the nation to take notice and Million Hoodie marches were organized across the country, garnering national attention. (Even Beyonce and Jay Z attended one in New York City after the verdict.)

So where is the Million Hoodie march for Renisha McBride?

While there are certainly activists organizing vigils across the country for McBride, they are noticeably smaller at this early stage in the case than the ones organized for Martin. Like Martin, McBride was gunned down inexplicably, and then labeled a threat by the shooter to justify the killing.

There is no question that Black men are under attack by a racist criminal justice system and a society that forever suspects them to be criminals. But when a young Black woman suffers the same fate as Trayvon Martin, the outrage appears to be concentrated among Black women, instead of a universal outrage with mass protests. That has got to change. Black women consistently show up for Black men, and yet the opposite is not true when Black women are the victims of injustice.

That Black bodies cannot simply exist and move about unmolested, without the threat of violence for little to no reason, links us back to the Jim Crow South, when Black bodies were labeled threatening and lynched in front of white communities. As Professor Jelani Cobb wrote in the New Yorker, “African-Americans are both the primary victims of violent crime in this country and the primary victims of the fear of that crime.” Both Renisha McBride and Trayvon Martin died as an apparent reaction to this discriminatory—and common—mindset.

There must be justice for Renisha McBride, for her family, and for her community. Black America is in a constant spin cycle of pain. The reasons given to justify the deaths of Black children are steeped in America’s checkered racial history and white supremacy.

The callousness with which Martin and McBride were killed should compel a national dialogue on race, inequality, profiling, and gun safety, but as long as white Americans refuse to acknowledge that Black people are not inherently a threat, and are capable of innocence deserving justice, the pain will continue. For a nation that claims to have a foundation of freedom and liberty, these killings are evidence of a nation lost and in denial, unable to find its way until all Americans can walk up to a home seeking help after an accident, and not receive a fatal shot to the face.

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  • Arakiba

    Black men don’t stand up for black women nearly as much as black women stand up for black men.

    • howwedoit

      Isn’t it obvious? Really sad.

    • Tracey Lin Miller

      so lead the change, if you’re male

      • Arekushieru

        I think it was pretty obvious that Arakiba isn’t male….

        • Arakiba

          Wrong. I do have a daughter though, she’s not male. ;)

          • Arekushieru

            My apologies, then for making my OWN assumption! But, either way, Tracey was making an assumption that just doesn’t stand up. She seemed to be assuming that an ally has more onus on them to lead the change than someone who is not an ally….

    • Donald Schuster

      Because we are bred to be weak and dependent and/or violent

      • Jennifer Starr

        You really are a racist idiot.

        • Arekushieru

          I think that would be sexist… no? Or, do you have evidence that Donald isn’t black? Just curious!

          • Jennifer Starr

            I can’t confirm, but from reading the virulent racism in his past Disqus postings, coupled with the fact that he’s a birther, I don’t think he is.

          • Arekushieru

            Okay, gotcha! :)

        • lesa

          So because someone doesnt agree with you they are racist idiots?! That right there by definition is ignorance.

      • JamieHaman

        Bred to be weak? Hardly.
        Dependent? More like willfully ignorant.
        Violent? Using physical strength regularly to kill, maim, and rape. Choices.

        Fortunately not every man believes your BS.

    • BlackFromSpace

      I’m a black man, and sister you are 100% right. We must “step it up” in many ways or else…..

  • Mmmmm propaganda.

    Maybe people are catching onto the fact that trying to make the guilty look innocent makes the people that are doing the “trying” look guilty. You just can’t put lipstick on a pig and call it a…

  • Paxmelanoleuca

    Is it at all plausible that the Renisha McBride case doesn’t fit as neatly into our prevailing cultural narratives of gun-toting, racist hillbillies in the rural South?

    Social psychology theory would also argue that it’s easier to blame those who are unlike us, not the same. Its easy to say that stereotyped rednecks are responsible for gun-violence; its harder when the shooter looks so much like ourselves. (Don’t forget that the “Million Hoodie March” was in NYC, not Orlando.)

    • colleen2

      Is it at all plausible that the Renisha McBride case doesn’t fit as
      neatly into our prevailing cultural narratives of gun-toting, racist
      hillbillies in the rural South?

      I hope not. Otherwise it’s normal to answer the door with a fricking shotgun and murder whoever is there. My guess is that the POS who did murder this young woman for knocking on his door was and is another racist Florida Republican asshole.

      • Paxmelanoleuca

        Thank you for making my point so eloquently.

        • Arekushieru

          Um, no, thank you for making OUR point so eloquently. Those who often seek to divert attention from the most obvious factors at play by using strawmen are usually the most racist/misogynistic of all.

          • Paxmelanoleuca

            Now I’m just confused. A strawman like the “racist Florida Republican asshole” running around shooting innocent women seeking help after a car-wreck in the head? Are you calling colleen2 a racist/misogynist?

            The truth is that gender and race and access to firearms are all factors in this tragedy, but when we talk about racism and gun-ownership in the United States, we have a tendency to pretend that those problems only exist south of Mason-Dixon line. I think those assumptions, and this belief that race and guns are only an issue in the rural south is PART of the reason why we haven’t seen the same outrage following the Renisha McBride case.

            (That and don’t forget that Trayvon Martin’s family did get help from Ryan Julison, an Orlando-based public relations specialist to re-ignite public passion in the tragedy.)

          • colleen2

            (That and don’t forget that Trayvon Martin’s family did get help from
            Ryan Julison, an Orlando-based public relations specialist to re-ignite
            public passion when his tragic death had begun to lose public
            attention.)

            I see you are no stranger to racist Republican assholes.

          • Paxmelanoleuca

            I know them all too well, and I’m learning more about the prejudicial leftist ones as well!

          • colleen2

            Perhaps if you stopped listening to right wing propaganda you8 wouldn’t sound so diseased and ugly.

          • Paxmelanoleuca

            LOL. We can stand here and flame each other all day long, I suppose, but that won’t get anybody anywhere. The article was wondering why there hasn’t been the same reaction to Renisha McBride’s case as there was regarding Trayvon Martin, and I hypothesized some theories.

            I’m not sure what I said that make me look like a “racist Republican asshole” or sound “diseased and ugly” from excessive consumption of “right wing propaganda,” but if that’s what you think, then that’s your prerogative.

            In the meantime, though, I had hoped to engage in a genuine analysis of possible reasons for the different reactions to the two tragedies, but clearly that’s not going to happen between you and I. If you’d like to go find somebody else to attack warrantlessly, please feel free.

          • colleen2

            I’m not ‘flaming’, you would know it if I were. I understand what you are and have no interest in “getting anywhere” in discussions with you. When you attack the parents of a murdered child and try to smear then with your right wing propaganda and innuendo that’s really very revealing.

          • Paxmelanoleuca

            I apologize, that was not at all my intent. I mentioned Ryan Julison because I think that utilizing his help in telling Trayvon’s story was absolutely the RIGHT thing to do. All too often the families of these victims do not have the chance to tell their story, and crimes such as Trayvon’s death go unheeded and unheard by the vast majority of the population.

            Trayvon’s story needed to be heard, and Julison’s work to get that story out was critical to the further pursuit of justice (although I’m not convinced that justice was served in the verdict of the Zimmerman trial). I wasn’t complaining at all. I think it was the right thing to do. I don’t know if Renisha McBride will get the same input from professionals, but I do know that in moving to charge Theodore Wafer, Renisha is already one step closer to justice then Trayvon ever got from the state of Florida until external pressure mounted on the state.

            I certainly don’t want to attack Trayvon’s parents, quite the opposite, I think they did the right thing in taking professional help to get their son’s story to the public.

            You understand nothing of who or what I am, and I find the assumption that I’m attempting to spread right wing propaganda or to smear their name in the wake of their son’s murder a bit offensive. I’m a little bemused that you’ve imagined so much intended offense where none was intended.

          • Arekushieru

            Um, excuse me, but intent is not ‘magical’. And for many people (INCLUDING myself), it is really difficult to read tone at the BEST (meaning verbal interactions) of times.

            And you’re missing the point. It is not our contention that these things ONLY happen in the South. That contention is actually an attitude often associated with Conservatives, that things happen only due to certain groups of people, never because of one of their own. OUR contention is that racist behaviours are more likely to be found in areas where class, race and sex divides are predominant. Which TEND to be the South.

            That is what Colleen was pointing out with this, “Otherwise it’s normal to answer the door with a fricking shotgun and
            murder whoever is there. My guess is that the POS who did murder this young woman for knocking on his door was and is another racist Florida Republican asshole.”

            If you don’t think that was it, please check out who marked up Stephen Kennedy’s comment. I’m sure you’ll note that Colleen was one of them. As I myself was. Want to know why? Because Stephen didn’t make the (at the very least, implied) assumption that we (meaning myself, Colleen et al and the author) were labeling an entire group of people because of fear (again, an attitude often associated with Conservatives, not Democrats).

          • colleen2

            LOL. Right I IMAGINED you wrote:

            “(That and don’t forget that Trayvon Martin’s family did get help from
            Ryan Julison, an Orlando-based public relations specialist to re-ignite
            public passion when his tragic death had begun to lose public
            attention.)”

            and now I’m supposed to believe that you didn’t “want to attack Trayvon’s parents” .Your problem is that there is no other reason for that paragraph to be there and your insincere, victimized explanation fails to address that fact..Yours was an obvious attack and a particularly disgusting one that Republicans have been using to discredit Trayvon Martin’s parents efforts to seek justice for the murder of their son. Your original intent was obvious

            Likewise, I said nothing about Racist Republican assholes being confined to the South. There are plenty outside the South and we all know that.

          • Paxmelanoleuca

            I’m going to be blunt for a minute and tell you that you’re a nut. I can’t help but find it ironic that you’re committing dozens of the sins you accuse “Racist Republicans” of committing regarding assumptions about and derogation of others.

            While attempting to take-down the existing systems of inequality and prejudice in this country is a laudable goal, and one which we must all pursue together, some individuals undermine the objectives by conducting themselves via the same logics which drive inequality in the first place.

            Unfortunate, I suppose, but we’re done here. Further discussion with a presumptuous bigot is a waste of my time.

          • colleen2

            I see no reason to continue this discussion. Please find another blog.

      • Stephen Kennedy

        As someone who lives in Florida, I have to point out that it isn’t the only state where “racist Republican a**holes” reside and/or originate. The mindset is rampant from coast to coast, and there are more than 30 states whose Republican-dominated legislatures and governors, prompted by their NRA and ALEC benefactors, have passed Stand Your Ground laws that make that mindset even more virulent and toxic to the peace and tranquility of our communities, and more dangerous for those whose skin tones are not characterized by that of the overwhelming majority of those who believe that those laws are a great idea.

      • T_R

        It’s a long way from Florida to Detroit.

  • expect_resistance

    This is really sad and F’ed up. We should all be marching for Renisha McBride.
    Why did they do a toxicology report on McBride? They didn’t do one on Wafer? It seems like there is a post-modorem demonization of African American youth.

    Democracy Now did a great show on this called, “Criminalizing Black Corpses” on Nov. 13.

    • AlanMorlock

      Toxicology reports are standard procedure in autopsies, which they performed.

  • outrageous

    Wafer is a pos.

  • Lynnsey

    Another part of this is the twisted new definition of “self-defense” we have in this country. It used to be that you could defend yourself from actual harm. Now, you can shoot anyone who makes you nervous…which, for some, means anyone of another race, unfortunately.

    • Lynnsey

      To Bridgette in moderation…

      I’ve read you before and I respectfully disagree with you. It really doesn’t matter what the Stand Your Ground laws (which I didn’t even mention, by the way) are *meant* to do. The important part is what happens in practice. SYG is muddying the waters about what self defense is even when they’re not technically used (which you yourself seem to admit). When you couple that with the gun-fondling that goes on in this country, people die because the answer isn’t to avoid confrontation and call the proper authorities, it’s instead to answer your door with your gun. You point out that this has actually increased the number homicides rather than *justifiable* homicides, but that is really irrelevant to the people who are dead and their families, isn’t it?

      • Bridgette Dunlap

        Some people really do believe self-defense or SYG means you can lawfully “shoot anyone who makes you nervous” as you put it. We should not encourage that very wrong and deadly notion by repeating it.

        • Lynnsey

          I think we agree on the problem, but not the solution. Again, whatever the SYG laws were meant to do, they and their inconsistent application ARE giving people a false idea about what their response should be and self-defense is increasingly being claimed (whether successfully or not which is really irrelevant) in cases where people weren’t actually in any real danger. This has the doubly troubling effect of a) people dying who needn’t and b) people going to jail because they’re stupid and scared and armed. I don’t think that drawing attention to the fact that people believe this AND are acting on it is “encouraging” it. I think we need to call it out and be more clear about what “self-defense” means and the SYG laws are counterproductive to that end.

          • http://robcypher.blogspot.com/ Rob Cypher

            Yes. Stricter guns laws are to be called for. Else more children and babies die for no reason at all.

          • Bridgette Dunlap

            Yes, SYG laws are terrible and getting people killed. They should be repealed. But part of why they are getting people killed is that people *think* the law of self-defense has changed more than it actually has.

      • teapartyidiots

        He’s invoking castle law, not SYG.

    • serlak2012

      How do you do self defense when someone sucker punch you to death for fun?

    • texassa

      YES!!! I completely agree with this. Self defense is not just using your death toy against any person that creeps you out or that you think you can later argue creeped you out.

  • Anon210

    Not to take anything away from Zerlina’s points, which are definitely correct, but there is a substantive difference here. Although Wafer wasn’t immediately arrested, he was charged in a timely manner, whereas Zimmerman was not. Indeed, in the case of Trayvon Martin’s murder, it took exactly the public pressure Zerlina refers to to prompt appointment of a special prosecutor and the filing of criminal charges. Obviously, we don’t know whether Wafer will ultimately be held accountable for Renisha’s murder at this point, but in this case there is more evidence that the system is working, and thus perhaps less of a felt need for demonstrations.

  • Chris Herz

    One big difference in the two cases — Martin and McBride’s — is that it looks like Mr Wafer is going to jail, where he belongs. Michigan has its problems, but it’s not Florida.

    • teapartyidiots

      Exactly – it may be for manslaughter – be he’s spending at least 10 years in prison.

  • serlak2012

    Black teenagers sucker punch for fun innocent woman and elderly people to death and then laugh in the camera when they talk about it. No wonder people start shooting when they see black people near their houses…. Next time I’ll see a gang of black half brained teenagers I’ll cross a street and if they do too I will shot to kill!

    • Liber8gibp

      So that is the only excuse you can come up with to defend the gunning down of an unarmed teenage woman?

      • serlak2012

        Most of you (African Americans) are racists, not much better than half brained hillbillies. You stump your “This is so racist” card every time you fail at something. “Oh I didn’t get a job, the business owner must be a racist”, “Oh republicans are cutting my “hard earned” government benefits, they must be racist”, “Oh people are clinching when I get into elevator with them, they must be racists”, and so on…. Every time some black guy/girl calls me a “white boy” I want to punch her/his teeth out. White skin color is not what defines me! But when I start hearing in the news that 4 blocks away from my house some half developed African American teenagers sucker punch elderly white women just for laughs my blood starts to boil. You are extremely ungrateful wastes of DNA, it is not enough that we pay from our paychecks for your food and shelter, we also suppose to entertain you by being cowardly knocked out from behind???? Shame on you African Americans, shame on you!

        I was against this white dude shooting that girl but after what has been happening in the news I lean towards his side. If you don’t know how to be a normal, law abiding citizens then don’t blame when people start shooting you for no good reason …..

      • serlak2012

        What a miserable attempt for “justice for all” you have going on here… Once you hear an opinion which is not going well with the general direction of the article – you just delete the comment….. How are you better then Fox “News” if all you do is propaganda? Looks like all what African American community can do well is just sneak up on elderly women and punch them from behind, to see how hilarious their victims fall to the ground head first…..

        • Arekushieru

          …says the person who has OBVIOUSLY fallen for Faux News propaganda ONE too many times….

          • colleen2

            the blog appears to have attracted some NRA trollers eager to see CCW’s transformed into hunting licenses for black children. I am amused by the guy claiming to be a mid-eastern woman.

        • Jennifer Starr

          Try writing comments that aren’t racist schlock and we’ll try not deleting them. All right?

          • serlak2012

            Got it, talking about whites attacking african americans is OK because it is for sure racism (how can it NOT BE ????), talking about african americans knocking out defenseless non-black women and seniors is NOT OK because the one who brings up this point is for sure racist…. No matter what someone brings to a conversation you’ll always have an answer – “You are racist!”

          • Jennifer Starr

            So what exactly is your point? Are you saying that Wafer was justified in shooting an unarmed woman on his porch because some people, somewhere else, are allegedly making a game out of knocking people out? Is that actually the logic you’re using?

          • serlak2012

            If you can’t resolve such fundamental judgment problems in your own community then don’t complaint when people are scared of african americans and when they respond with unnecessary show of force. That is not racism, that is common sense and self defense….

          • Jennifer Starr

            Wrong answer. You can’t hold one person responsible for crimes allegedly committed by others who happen to have the same skin pigmentation. Shooting an unarmed woman on your doorstep is not common sense. Nor is it self-defense just because you’re ‘scared’. But it is criminal behavior, and the fact that you defend this shows that you have very poor judgment. I won’t even get into your spelling and grammar.

          • serlak2012

            I wonder if you would be so outraged if a black guy was on the inside and white woman outside….

          • Jennifer Starr

            Either way it would still be a crime. In what universe is shooting an unarmed person on your doorstep a rational response?

          • CJ99

            Upon reading your ignorant commentary the descriptor of stupid is more applicable to yourself.

        • Jennifer Starr

          Also you might try writing comments which are at least semi-literate. Just an observation.

  • Robert Riversong

    Why not march for a woman who was driving at 11 times the legal blood alcohol limit for a minor and nearly three times the limit for an adult, who crashed her third car and then twice fled the scene of her accident, refusing help offered by neighbors and then stumbling on a stranger’s porch two hours later?

    You marched for the criminal Trayvon after he brutally assaulted an innocent neighborhood watch volunteer.

    • texassa

      Oh, Robert. Just sad for you and everyone like you.

      • Robert Riversong

        Do you have a problem with factually accurate accounts?

        • Nur Alia binti Ahmad

          So…the next time the police see a drunken driver, they can render a summary judgment, and execute the driver…right?

          • Robert Riversong

            They can and should arrest her at the scene or find and arrest her for leaving the scene (another crime) – both for her own safety and to protect the public from an act that kills as many people as gunshots every year.

            The fact that she twice fled the scene of an accident to avoid arrest was what put her in danger, just as Trayvon Martin’s decision to assault a neighborhood watch volunteer put his life in jeopardy.

            Until we start recognizing that people make irresponsible, reckless and criminal decisions that contribute to their own demise, we will be placing the blame in the wrong place.

          • Nur Alia binti Ahmad

            What you are claiming is that the shooter had the right to kill her because she committed crimes while driving drunk,

            What legal authorization did the shooter have to convict her and render the judgment of execution on her for drunken driving?

            What evidence did the shooter gather and have to justify his summary judgement? Breath and blood tests? Pictures from the scene of her crimes? Witnesses? Did she have representation, rebuttal witnesses?

            I see.

          • Stephen Kennedy

            Yours is the mindset of a willfully ignorant person who refuses to acknowledge their own logical fallacies, regardless of specific evidence to the contrary. Yours is a mindset that won’t be changed, so it’s fruitless for anyone with an opposing viewpoint to rebut your statements, especially with facts. Nonetheless, here’s one for you to consider, accompanied by some questions for you to ponder. There might come a time in the future when you, a relative, or a close friend may make some significant mistakes in your or their lives, respectively. It might be public drunkenness. It might be shoplifting. It might be drunk driving that results in a car accident in which someone else is injured. The shame of committing those offenses might make you or them want to avoid responsibility, and leave the scene of their crime. Or, it might be that, in the case of the accident, a head injury, or a sense of urgency, might make you or them leave the scene to seek help from someone else. What would your response be if the person from whom they sought help decided that they deserved to die or that you or they were threatening somehow, and took your or their life without any concern, or without asking any questions? Would you say you or they shouldn’t have put themselves in that position? Would you wonder why anyone would be so callous, or act so cavalierly, as to kill you or them for no reason…or because the real reason was that your, or their, skin color was different from that of the killer? If your answers are “no” to the penultimate question, and “yes” to the last question, then you might be able to empathize with Renisha McBride, and her family and friends; perhaps understanding their anger, outrage, sorrow, and grief at her unjustifiable loss to a murderer. If your answers to those two questions are reversed, then you might want to shop for a six-pack of empathy from your local Wal-Mart. I hear they’re on sale for the holiday season.

          • Stephen Kennedy

            The fact that she wasn’t AT the scene of the accident pokes a large hole in your argument. The police couldn’t arrest her for drunk driving because by the time they got there, she was already shot to death on the perpetrator’s front porch. So much for “public safety”.

          • CJ99

            here you are still spewing on about recklessness, criminality & others you see as irresponsible while you advocate homicide.

        • CJ99

          Yes you do have that problem. In reality you can’t even get it right trying to be a contrarian. Your account consists of nothing other than verbal diarrea.

    • Stephen Kennedy

      …and I’m sure you thump your chest really hard in your pew on Sunday, as you flip through that well-worn Bible of yours to find the right words to praise your savior, Jesus Christ. Have the meanings of “hypocrisy” and “slander” ever been explained to you?

      • Robert Riversong

        Have the meanings of truth and justice ever been explained to you?

        • Nur Alia binti Ahmad

          So the woman didn’t deserve justice, she deserved to be executed for driving drunk,,,right?

          • Robert Riversong

            That you continue to deliberately twist and distort my comments indicates only your intellectual dishonesty.

          • Nur Alia binti Ahmad

            I am using YOUR logic. YOUR logic is that the shooter is acting as an ‘arm of the law’ against a law breaker’ Had the girl not ‘broken the law’, she would not have been judged and executed by a citizen ‘enforcing the law’.

            I get it Judge Dredd.

            Your claim is that she put herself in the situation by drunken driving. So, since she was executed, your logic is that the shooter had the right to judge her and execute her as a matter the law.

          • Stephen Kennedy

            The fact is that her erratic behavior might also have been caused by a head injury sustained in the car wreck. She still didn’t deserve an execution.

          • Jennifer Starr

            No she definitely did not. That people are actually defending this man is unbelievable.

          • Nur Alia binti Ahmad

            Oh….I see now.
            She was executed because she ‘acted erratic’. I didn’t know it was even against the law to act erratic.
            Shooting through a locked screen door, and waiting an hour before calling the police may seem ‘erratic’ too. Usually a person believing his life was in danger, secured behind a locked door would run to the phone and dial the police before they grabbed a shotgun
            The difference here is, Renisha cant explain herself, not given the chance to present a defense before she was charged, tried, convicted and executed.
            So…lets figure out your reasoning again.

        • expect_resistance

          Obviously they haven’t been explained to you.

        • Stephen Kennedy

          As a Black man raised in the United States of America watching events unfold in this country for the last 60+ years, my understanding of truth and justice are VERY well-developed. Trust me. I also understand that a person does not deserve to be summarily shot to death for no other reason than the paranoia and racist attitudes of the perpetrator, regardless of that person’s history.

        • CJ99

          Indeed Stephen understands those concepts quite well. You however do not out of your own choices.

    • Nur Alia binti Ahmad

      Because driving drunk is not an executable offence.

      • Robert Riversong

        That’s not the point.

        The early civil rights movement was very careful about whom to select as their standard-bearer. A teenaged woman had preceded Rosa Parks in refusing to give up her bus seat, but the Montgomery civil rights community didn’t want to organize around her arrest since she was unmarried and pregnant. So they waited until NAACP secretary Rosa Parks, who had impeccable credentials, refused to move to the back of the bus.

        What remains of the civil rights movement today has made far greater errors in organizing around a deeply troubled, violent young man named Trayvon Martin, who was involved in criminal behavior including the brutal assault on the man who shot him in self-defense.

        If that same community now organizes around Renisha McBride, a young woman who would not have placed herself in danger had she not driven in a near alcoholic stupor, then it will discredit itself into irrelevancy and fan the flames of racial hatred in America.

        • Nur Alia binti Ahmad

          Again…the point is, that a woman was executed by a civilian for…as you are trying to justify…drunken driving.

          • Robert Riversong

            Nothing I’ve posted her justifies vigilante justice, and your creating a straw man merely discredits you.

          • Jennifer Starr

            Vigilantism is precisely what you’ve been promoting.

          • CJ99

            Start behaving in a credible fashion before you start howling at others about credibility.

        • Jennifer Starr

          I remember when neighborhood watch started. Neighborhood watch is about keeping an eye on your neighbors and calling the Police if there is a problem. It is not about getting to play pretend cop yourself.

        • Jennifer Starr

          If a dazed woman (or man), wandered onto my front porch asking for help, my first instinct would be to call the police and say that someone needed help. Being a woman who lives alone I would probably not let them inside, but my first response would definitely not be to reach for my gun and shoot somebody. In what universe is that an acceptable response?

          • CJ99

            As a kid I watched star trek a lot, they showed a place much like that in an episode called Mirror Mirror.

    • Jennifer Starr

      George Zimmerman was not a police officer nor was he a licensed security guard. He was not authorized to conduct armed patrols nor was he authorized to play police officer and follow anyone. He wasn’t even an official Neighborhood Watch volunteer. In fact, he was told not to follow when he called 911. For all Trayvon knew, Zimmerman was some kind of mugger or weirdo following him, and he had to defend himself. You don’t know squat about truth and justice.

      • Robert Riversong

        I know that George Zimmerman had stood up for the underdog all his life, including the homeless black man who was assaulted by the son of a Sanford police officer, and that he was widely known as dedicated to serving his community in a very professional manner.

        Wendy Dorival, the volunteer program coordinator for the Sanford Police Department, who trained George Zimmerman for Neighborhood Watch, testified in court that she encourages neighbors to know who doesn’t belong and to call police if anything or anyone appears in any way suspicious or out of place and that a person walking in the rain between houses without a particular purpose – a description of Trayvon the night of the shooting – would be considered suspicious. Dorival denied that her training included a prohibition against following at a distance to gather information to provide to the police. And Dorival said she doesn’t discuss whether residents should carry firearms while participating in a Neighborhood Watch program, only that they must follow the law, and that they have the right to protect themselves if attacked.

        Sean Noffke, the Sanford police dispatcher who was on the phone with Zimmerman, testified in court that Zimmerman could have reasonably understood his question “Which way is he running?” as a request to get out of his vehicle and take a look. He also testified that he is NOT a police officer and is forbidden by policy from saying anything that even sounds like an order. But, when he did say to Zimmerman “we don’t need you to do that”, Zimmerman immediately responded “OK”, indicating continued compliance with the dispatcher’s requests.

        So we DO know that Zimmerman acted in perfect accord with his role as a Neighborhood Watch volunteer, which he most certainly was, and that he was brutally assaulted without provocation.

        • Jennifer Starr

          Trayvon was just trying to get home, he was not armed, not committing any crimes, there is no proof that he was planning to commit crimes. and he was being followed by a stranger who was armed and not in any uniform. For all Trayvon knew, this guy was some kind of mugger. And Zimmerman was in fact the one with the prior criminal record, and if recent actions are anything to go by, he doesn’t seem to be able to stay out of trouble with the law.

          If George Zimmerman was in fact, assaulted like he claims, the fact remains that he put himself in that situation by playing vigilante. If he hadn’t followed him, there would have been nothing to ‘stand his ground’ against.

        • Nur Alia binti Ahmad

          YOU keep making this into a ‘race’ issue because it suits your argument. Zimmerman got a trial, and it is over.

          This article is about an unarmed woman who was shot in the face by a man through a locked screen door.

          Your claim is, that had not Renisha McBride committed crimes related to her drunken driving, she would have been alive today.
          In other words, to you the shooting is ‘justified’ because the shooter acted within the law for, charging her, judging her, sentencing her, and executing her for drunken driving, and crimes associated with that offence.

          So, in the jurisdiction where the accident occurred, is drunken driving an executable offence? What legal authorization did the shooter have to charge, judge, sentence, and execture Ms McBride?

          What evidence did the shooter use to render the judgment? What forensics did he use? Witnesses? Photos?
          Did she have legal representation? Rebuttal statement? witnesses?

          Now…using YOUR logic, please justify the execution of this woman by the shooter on legal grounds…remembering your claim that ‘she put herself in the situation by drunken driving.

        • Stephen Kennedy

          What you know about George Zimmerman’s “public service” is what you’ve heard on FoxNews, the Great Incubator and Disseminator of Lies, Distortions, Miniformation and Fallacy. There’s a shrine built to that network in Philadelphia, Mississippi. They have human sacrifice ceremonies there, regularly, every full moon. White robes and cone-shaped hoods are required dress.

        • CJ99

          you know no such thing as George Zimmerman did no such thing. he’s no different then Bernard Goetz.

        • Arakiba

          lol, “standing up for the underdog”, like threatening his ex and her father, and then threatening his current girlfriend. Oh yeah, and molesting his cousin while they were growing up. Yep, he’s certainly a great role model for the Republicans, the Tea Party, and the NRA! :)

  • painkills2

    I’d like to know what this guy was so afraid of. I mean, I’m serious, what did he think was happening or was going to happen? As he appears racist, was it just the color of her skin, or did he think she was a drug dealer or something? Did he think the woman was somehow going to overpower him? Overpower a guy with a shotgun? Somebody please help me reason out what this guy freaked out.

    • gregorylkruse

      Maybe he thought she was a zombie.

    • MCLepus

      I’ve heard the “home invasion” excuse. “there are a lot of home invasions” he was afraid…. last reported Home invasion in Dearborn Heaights was in January of 2013, and judging by the newspaper account, he was white – no name or race indicated. that’s news code for “white person”

    • expect_resistance

      I think race had something to do with this.

      I had something similar happen to me, but I didn’t shoot her.

      Late one night, I heard loud knocking at my door and heard a woman screaming. I opened the door to a woman who had been assaulted and was lying on the ground with blood trailing behind her. She was a tall Native American woman and I’m a short white woman. I could have been afraid and not answered my door. I don’t have a gun so I wouldn’t have shot her. Even if I did I wouldn’t have shot her.

      Instead of shooting her, I opened the door to see what was going on. The woman outside my door was hurt, bleeding, and in pain. She had been sexually assaulted and dumped outside my apartment building. I called 911 for an ambulance. The police arrived first. I’ve had some bad interactions with the police and wasn’t thrilled to see them. I was also afraid they might not treat her fairly because she was Native American. I repeated to the police over and over that she was a victim and was to be taken to the hospital and not taken to jail for anything. I told her that I wasn’t calling the police on her but they were there to help her and file a report on her assault. I waited with her until medical arrived and took her to the hospital.

      What if I would have been a racist asshole and shot her? I’m glad I was able to help her and comfort her and I hope the cops got they guy(s) who assaulted her.

      • Jennifer Starr

        You were a wonderful person to help her like that.

        • expect_resistance

          Thanks Jennifer. It taught me a valuable lesson to not judge and help people in need.

          • painkills2

            Great story, thanks for sharing.

      • CJ99

        More people should do what you did. Oddly enough where I live (probly very different city) the police here can be very dubious and I’ve experienced it myself.

  • Nur Alia binti Ahmad

    I think that there is no ‘racial component’ here, or gender issue here.
    The difference between Trayvon Martin’s death, and Ms. McBride’s death is, the police in the case of the latter did their job, and arrested the shooter. He will have his day in court.
    What made Trayvon’s case ‘racial’ was the media, and most of that is because Trayvon’s family could not get answers as to what happened to their son. Zimmerman was not arrested because the police used the ‘stand your ground’ defence as the justification not to arrest him.
    We need to stop following the media narrative of calling everything a ‘racial’ or a ‘gender’ issue. What we need to be pointing out is injustice, and not helping those who benefit from injustice steer the conversation in a way where they can control it.

    • Guest

      You’re right on all counts, except in trying to separate the factors. It’s all connected because all of those factors you cite comprise the entire picture.

      • Nur Alia binti Ahmad

        ‘Race’ comprises the picture because the media frames it that way to steer the conversation away from the root.

        Americans have a hard time admitting their past, and ‘race’ automatically brings up the ‘defense’ that drowns out the real cause of the problem…injustice.

        Martin Luther King spoke of ‘injustice’, and wanted ‘equality’. The media used the fact that most of the people who walked with him were Black to make the issue a racial one. Now it is being played back, and it is lost that Martin Luther King was not fighting for rights for African Americans, but for fighting for anyone who was disenfranchised and displaced by injustice.

        Jesus had the message right, and most civil justice leaders followed the message of Jesus. Lets use the phrasing of Jesus, and speak of injustice and inequality, and not help those who oppress by using their speech to describe our problems.

        • Arekushieru

          I’m sorry, but I absolutely CANNOT agree. I am not going to presume to speak for anyone other than where my own experiences and lack of privilege intersect. So, here’s an example; That’s like saying that the injustice I face as a WOMAN is the same as the injustice faced by a man. They are two totally different things. That need to be addressed with completely different solutions. It is NOT a homogenous problem, after all.

          • Nur Alia binti Ahmad

            What is the solution for discrimination?

            Is it to keep complaining about being discriminated against? Is it setting yourself apart from the same injustice as other people get for other reasons?

            Remember, you used the word SOLUTION. Repeating the problem over and over again…as we have done, and setting yourself apart from other people suffering the SAME injustice for different reasons only allows those who are against justice wedge between us, divide us and destroy us, so, it isn’t a SOLUTION.

          • Arekushieru

            They are NOT suffering the SAME injustice. I, as a WOMAN, am suffering a far GREATER injustice than a MAN does. Equating the two is NOT a solution. It actually only further HARMS women. DERP.

    • Arekushieru

      But, is that the victim’s fault or the perpetrator’s fault? It seems like you’re saying that, anyways, especially when you imply that the only way to keep those in a position of privilege from widening the gap, so to speak, is for those who are less privileged and their allies to keep silent. That appears to be much like the narrative we see oft-played out between the victim and the perpetrator in MANY a scenario.

      • Nur Alia binti Ahmad

        Where exactly did I say or imply that the oppressed should be quiet? Where did I blame ‘the victim’?

        What I am trying to say is, stop setting yourself apart from people who are suffering the same injustice for different reasons, and letting those who don’t want you to have justice wedge between you.

        I certainly don’t have to say, join other voices against injustice rather than sit alone crying victim all the time…do I?

        • Arekushieru

          That IS victim-blaming. Telling those who suffer oppression to do the work rather than the oppressors or those of the oppressor group IS EXACTLY THAT.

        • Arakiba

          Admitting a problem exists is the first step to solving it, not ignoring the problem or saying it isn’t a problem at all.

    • colleen2

      “I think that there is no ‘racial component’ here, or gender issue here”

      You would be wrong then

      • Nur Alia binti Ahmad

        Yes, keep playing the game, and keep beliving that complaining about race and gender over and over again is a solution, and we will be here years from now talking about the same damn thing.
        So no, you are right from your perspective. Don’t expect me to support you though. I refuse to keep being a victim.

        • colleen2

          LOL! I assure you that nobody here needs the support of Republican sock puppets .

        • Arakiba

          Keep telling yourself you’re not a victim and that you won’t be a victim if a white man decides you look “threatening”.

    • Arakiba

      Insisting there’s no racial or gender issues will not save you.

    • lesa

      I agree. I think far too often it is made into a race issue when it wasnt from the beginning.

  • gregorylkruse

    It seems awkward trying to connect this case to either race or gender. There seems to be issues of poverty, alcoholism, and intellectual disability involved, and that’s only on one side. The trial will reveal other issues such as the desire to bear arms, militarism, and paranoia, to name a few. Somehow those accomplished individuals who have learned to manipulate the world to their excessive advantage have also caught a virus that makes them despise those who have not learned, or are incapable of learning what they have. This situation causes much frustration, envy, and hatred among the disadvantaged, and results in incidents like this one.

    • Stephen Kennedy

      WHAT???? That is the biggest pile of pseudo-intellectual tripe on this page. That’s saying something considering the bilge being spewed by Robert Birdsong.

      • Stephen Kennedy

        Blaming the victim is also a classic tactic of the vigilante, and the propagandist. Renisha McBride didn’t pull the trigger and blow her own brains out. she asked for help, and was given a death sentence. Period. Under whose behavioral code is that justifiable?

  • BrittanyLouis

    Trayvon was being denied justice by Florida. It took a country wide fight to get them to even prosecute. Detroit however noticed the lies the police told her family and lies that the killer was telling and promptly locked him up and filed murder charges against him and didn’t let him cry “self defense”.

    We don’t need to rally for her because the justice system is actually working in this case.

  • texassa

    You cannot just kill another person! When will people understand this? Somehow when it comes to guns, there is a mentality – among some – that anything goes because guns are our American ‘right.’ Can you imagine mowing over someone with your car and then casually saying, ‘well I thought I was in danger’ or ‘they looked dangerous.’ This is simply disgusting.

    • Robert Riversong

      In fact, mowing over someone in your car because they thought they were in danger is exactly what Alexian Lien did in NYC on 9/29, and the same people who are condemning the likes of Zimmerman and Wafer supported his action as legitimate – AND he was never arrested nor charged for driving deliberately over a motocyclist and breaking his back and destroying much of his body.

      • Judy Jackson

        Have you SEEN the video of those biker thugs? THEY caused the trouble, THEY caused the accident, THEY should be in jail. There were over 200 calls to NYPD that day from people who had been harassed & threatened by the biker thugs. NO sympathy for the bikers AT ALL. Mr. Lien had been harassed for miles, as shown by the video footage from the helmet cam of one of the bikers. Had it been MY family being threatened by those thugs, I’d have AIMED for more of them.

  • Bridgette Dunlap

    Agree.

  • Whitney

    Totally right. But let’s see what happens with the verdict. Maybe the activism around Trayvon will influence justice in this case.

    • Robert Riversong

      The activism around Trayvon Martin was an attempt to racialize a demonstrably non-racial incident and to publicly lynch a man who was correctly determined to be innocent by a jury.

      • Whitney

        Riiiight…. I would say “tell us more” but I’m sure you will.

      • colleen2

        Right. Because we just need to get used to the idea that Republicans can shoot unarmed children in our back yards in “self defense”.

      • Judy Jackson

        Zimmerman is a ticking time bomb & it is only a matter of time before he kills again. He is a MENACE to society.

  • Pelu Maad

    The march was necessary to counter the Sanford P D cover-up of the murder of Trayvon…..to get action. In the McBride case, the authorities are going through the motions without pressure…which is not to say a march won’t eventually be necessary.

  • Arekushieru

    Um, I’m a white woman, but I wouldn’t say my concerns are the same as a WHITE man’s? DERP.

  • Diana

    But black men have no problem getting on social networks marching for other black men and talking about it, why is that? What’s you all’s saying “Homies over hoes” right? A lot of black men like you benefit through patriarchy so of course it’s a non-factor to you. Stop making excuses for the lack of support black males offer to black women. You guys are content when someone is coddling you and making sure your images are protected, but offering the same in return is like the hardest game to ever play huh? Same with the Rutgers women when they were so wrongfully labeled with racist/sexist terms not one negro male in the media defended them after it went public. It seems like you all only spew that divide and conquer crap when you’re being shown up or exposed in some sort of way. Meanwhile back at the ranch you’re silent as a lamb. Imagine if black women collectively stop being mammies and mules for black men and the black community?

  • TruthTalk

    Zerlina Maxwell it is pure speculation that Renisha was in search for help right after her accident. Not one person has come forward to say “she also knocked on my door” Not one person has said “Oh, i saw her knocking on doors looking 4 help”. A witness at the scene of her accident spoke to her, said she had minor injuries, told her she was calling 911 and did so. Afterwards she came back within minutes and Renisha was gone. She fled the scene as she was extremely intoxicated and stoned. Renisha was shot miles away from the scene for simply knocking on a strangers door. The shooter deseveres a life sentence at the very least or death row. You do not know if she was looking 4 help, for all we know she could have fled the scene to get away and became exhausted and just wanted a ride home.

    • Diana

      Lmao you probably didn’t read the details of the tragedy until someone started bringing up intoxication levels. Matter of fact you probably knew nothing of the story until you started seeing your fellow white counterparts latch on to the intoxication bull. Typical non-black person, latching on to non-justifiable b.s. just so you can make the victim the bad person, especially if they’re black or of color. And, if you’re black you’re just as ignorant, if not more. Talking about pure speculation, isn’t that what your ignorant ass is doing? The man shot her through his door, she wasn’t even posing a damn threat. And since when did being drunk justify someone getting their brains blown out? She bumped a parked car dumb ass, she didn’t kill anyone. She was a 19 year old female not a serial killer.

  • http://blackmediawatcher.wordpress.com/ ConsciousBM

    You do know there are enough self-described Black Feminist where they could form a protest on their own…. not saying they should have to shoulder this alone because I’ve been calling for more media attention on her as well but I’m just saying if all these strong black women who already reasoned to themselves (and trying venomously to reason to others) that they can’t trust or rely on black men then WHY ON EARTH would you wait on us to do something when you could do it yourself? Where is all that strong sisterhood when it’s not blogging and tweeting?
    Regular Feminist don’t wait on men to protest with them, they go right ahead without them because that’s what equality looks like. Women that are equal to a man can launch a protest without their consent. If Black Feminist rallied all the local women into a uproar then there wouldn’t be a need for an article like this. Instead it would be a article like, “Sister Solidarity; Women creating Action”.
    Personally I think the national Trayvon Martin reaction compare to the national Renisha reaction was more about marketability than gender bias. Trayvon was shown as a child and he was killed walking with a bag of skittles basically he was the picture of Black innocence (according to the preferred media narrative) and it would of been triple true had it been a young black girl because girls convey more innocence than boys do.
    Renisha however was never presented as a kid instead she was presented as a young adult who was clearly drunk and high (not justifying her killing, just the lack of supporters and crusaders) at the time and since black people are still suffering the morale blow of a Zimmerman acquittal it just doesn’t seem like she will be the next big vehicle for collective Black outrage.
    It’s not a Black men not supporting Black Women thing so much as it is a defeated community not wanting to bring on more collective disappointment. That’s why a lot of black women aren’t so quick to champion Renisha McBride but I guess only men can be unsupportive according to the #Blackpowerisforblackmen ethos.

  • Donald Schuster

    The writer hits the nail on the head. Their BLACK bodies have NO value. More sadly, their black LIVE bodies had little vaule because they sold and/or consumed drugs, prostituted themselves, or – like darling lil Trayvon – stawked innocent citizens. We cannot ever be equal until we develop the same dignity exhibited by the whites.

    • Jennifer Starr

      Correction. George Zimmerman stalked (note the correct spelling) Trayvon Martin. Not the other way around. Try and keep your facts straight, please.

  • Arakiba

    Black men want Black women to stand up for them, but they very rarely return the favor.

  • Othello Brown

    Don’t be silly. We all marched for justice. We marched because the killer was never arrested. We marched to help a mother get justice for her child. You STRONG sisters kill me with silliness like this. You forget about the marches for Towanna Bradley and the sister from Duke. Even though both cases turned out to be some bull we were there. And to all the sisters claiming we can’t handle a strong Black woman quit that line. Take some responsibility. Chill with the attitude. We love you. We just don’t want to fight you. But articles like this explain why yall are all up in Scandal every week. Stop affirming negativity and speak love.

  • Sheila McAndrews Toomey

    Perhaps those black females are not conducting themselves “as if though they are men”
    Perhaps she is a human acting human.

  • CarolinaSistah

    The more I hear from this pundit, the less I’m impressed. What would we be in protest of? Her shooter has been charged. The system is working. In Trayvon’s case, it appeared no justice was forthcoming until it was demanded. Trayvon still got no justice and the man who shot him seems to have no peace.

  • Na_na99

    Seriously? You expect the same men who will call you a HO and a NAPPY HEADED BITCH to care enough to march for us? And the men who make rappers into millionaires for saying it? Is this even a surprise?

  • Bro James J Muh

    Dr. James Muhammad …..I need the facts so we can mobilize action…NOW…PEACE 904-613-0729