• crowepps

    I sure would like to know exactly what legal ‘rights’ the unofficial poll watchers have and how much they are allowed to interfere with voters.  When I go in to vote, I am concentrating on what I am doing and going over the list in my head of various candidates that I have chosen to support.  I do not want that process interrupted by a challenge from another *private* citizen who has decided he/she doesn’t think I *look like* a legitimate voter, and who feels entitled to inconvenience me while demanding to have her/his suspicions assuaged.

  • jessicawyant

    Voter suppression and/or harassment would be anon-issure if all states made the transition to mail-in only ballots as Washington State has.  You can easily register or update your registration online, via snail mail, or in person (though I’ve never done so in person), and ballots are cast via mail or drop boxes only. Though this means we no longer get cute little “I voted” stickers, it means that all choices are made within the privacy of one’s own home, where one (usually) has the ability to do some research on the candidates/initiaves/issues and take as long as they want to make their choices.  With this system, the only way I can think of to harass voters or make sure they’d be unable to cast their votes would be to camp out at every mailbox and drop box in the state, though by this time your vote has already been filled in and sealed in TWO tamper-proof envelopes. Either that, or commit some extremely widespread mail tampering or large scale terrorism against the USPS (which, nutty as some anti-choicers may be, seems like a stretch even for them).

  • flying-nosehair

    “Voter suppression and/or harassment would be anon-issure if all states made the transition to mail-in only ballots as Washington State has.”

    So how do homeless people vote?

  • leftcoaster

    Washington went to an all-mail voting system a couple of years ago, saving an enormous amount of money and time spent transporting ballots. It’s worked incredibly well. As a former reporter who’s witnessed the tallying process, I can assure everyone that there are no more security or fraud concerns in connection with this system and, in fact, probably it is a better safeguard. The best part was covering elections for a daily paper with an extended deadline of 10 p.m. .. The ballots were fed into machines throughout the week, but not until 8 p.m. were they officially tallied. We had preliminary results in 15 minutes. A win-win for voters, the press, and the integrity of the process.

     

  • leftcoaster

    Are not eligible to vote in any jurisdiction. It has nothing to do with where voting takes place. Theoretically you must be a resident of a district to vote, and registering requires producing some sort of proof of where you live. I’m sure some get around it by using other peoples’ addresses (which IMO is good) – but if they have an address at which they can receive mail, they can vote by mail.

  • nick-crane

    In King County homeless voters can use the address of homeless shelter, moblile home parks or a street corner. http://www.kingcounty.gov/elections/registration.aspx#nontrad  So if you are homeless check with your local voting board and don’t believe that you can’t vote because it is a mistake or you are being lied to.

     

  • colleen

    Are not eligible to vote in any jurisdiction. It has nothing to do with where voting takes place

     The matter has gone through the courts.  Because so many veterans are homeless, these folks have compiled a list. I don’t know how current the list is but you are completely wrong when you say that the homeless aren’t eligible to vote.

     

       http://www.veteransparty.us/homeless.htm

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