What “Mystery Group” Wants a Direct and Immediate Roe V. Wade Challenge?


Anti-choice activists have been taken the approach of chipping away at Roe V. Wade without trying to challenge it directly, stating a full challenge is too risky with the current makeup of the court.  They’ve tried to talk Ohio out of pushing for the “heartbeat ban,” and torpedoed a bill in North Dakota that would ban the procedure all together.

But the cautious approach has some definite dissenters, and they are getting more impatient and ambitious. Rep. John LaBruzzo in Louisiana is trying to push for a full abortion ban to challenge Roe V. Wade directly, and is doing it at the request of an anti-abortion group that wants to remain anonymous.

Via Nola.com:

LaBruzzo, describing himself as “unapologetically pro-life,” said his House Bill 587 is designed to take on the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court ruling, Roe v.Wade, that made abortion legal in the United States. ….

LaBruzzo said he filed the bill after being approached by a conservative religious group he did not name.

LaBruzzo’s bill says that “all abortions at any and all stages of the unborn child’s development” should be banned in the state.

Asked how his bill squares with the federal court rulings, LaBruzzo said: “I believe it would be in direct conflict with them … and immediately go to court. That is the goal of the individuals who asked me to put this bill in.”

So who is the mystery group that is asking legislators to try to legislate a Roe V. Wade challenge, and is the anti-choice movement finally beginning to schism?  Which other legislators have been approached and, even more interesting, is the legislation that they are shopping around like the draft they provided to LaBruzzo, which originally advocated charging both the doctor and the woman who gets the abortion with feticide?

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  • crowepps

    Well, there’s the Mormon Church, which got stung when people found out they were funding all the anti-gay propositions and might want to keep things quiet, and the Catholic bishops, who want to distract everybody from the pedophile scandal that is still being revealed.  Then there are the various obscenely rich religious fanatics who want to buy their way into heaven by financing morality for other people.  We’re kind of spoiled for choice, aren’t we?  How could we possibly just pick one?

  • beenthere72

    My guess is that this group has something to do with all conservative legislation:

     

    http://www.alec.org

     

    I keep hearing their name pop up lately around what’s going on in Wisconsin and elsewhere.   Seems like a wealthy fraternity to me.    They probably drum up this controversal legislation to distract us from their true agendas and/or frenzy up their conservative base so that they’ll support them while they turn around and give corporations more, and the people less, breaks.

     

    http://motherjones.com/politics/2002/09/ghostwriting-law

     

    Here, this is more current:

     

    http://ohiodailyblog.com/content/alec-vast-right-wing-conspiracy

     

  • beenthere72

    Ummm, holy shit:

     

    http://www.followthemoney.org/database/IndustryTotals.phtml?f=0&s=0&b=J3300&b=J3500

    TABLE 1: Limited Government, Republican-based groups (but not official party committees) and generic conservative ones Contributions to All Candidates and Committees

    Donations to Republicans: $53,814,676

     

    Just to show the difference:

     

    Democratic-based groups (but not official party committees) and generic liberal/progressive ones Contributions to All Candidates and Committees

     

    Donations to Democrats: $26,887,863