Fighting Black Anti-Choice Campaigns: Trust Black Women


This article is cross-posted from On the Issues Magazine.

Editor’s note: Read all of RH Reality Check’s coverage of this racist anti-choice campaign.

Sixty-five billboards were quickly erected in predominantly African American neighborhoods in Atlanta on February 5, 2010. Each showed a sorrowful picture of a black male child proclaiming, “Black Children are an Endangered Species.”

Georgia Right to Life and the newly-formed Radiance Foundation spent $20,000 to sponsor the billboards that included the address of a previously unknown anti-abortion website.

This was the opening salvo in a campaign to pass new state legislation attempting to criminalize abortions provided to women of color allegedly because of the “race or sex” of the fetus. Doctors would have been subjected to criminal sanctions and civil lawsuits. Central to the argument of our opponents was the false claim that most, if not all, abortions are coerced.

At Sister Song Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective, where one of the billboards was only a few blocks away, we knew that this race- and gender-baiting campaign would have national implications, driving a racial wedge in the pro-choice movement and a gender wedge in communities of color. The legislation would also trigger a challenge to Roe v. Wade.

Although SisterSong had not expected this fight, we could not afford to be silent. We surged into action to challenge the marketing of the billboards and the legislation. We formed a coalition for the fight with SPARK Reproductive Justice NOW!, Feminist Women’s Health Center, SisterLove, Planned Parenthood of the Southeast Region, and Raksha. We strategized together to use a reproductive justice approach that intersected race and gender as the smartest way to counter this intersectional attack on abortion rights.

We succeeded – this time. We won, in part, by shifting the debate, researching our opponents, understanding the divisions among our opponents, correcting their “facts,” and engaging our Civil Rights allies. In the process, we made new discoveries about how to deal with this latest tactic of our opponents.

Identifying the Campaign

Because of the conflation of race, gender and abortion, the billboards very quickly became national news, picked up by CNN, The New York Times, ABC, The LA Times and many others.

Our opponents began a misogynistic attack to shame-and-blame black women who choose abortion, alleging that we endanger the future of our children. After all, many people in our community already believe that black men are an endangered species because of white supremacy. Our opponents used a social responsibility frame to claim that black women have a racial obligation to have more babies – especially black male babies — despite our individual circumstances.

The campaign also accused Planned Parenthood, the largest single provider of birth control and abortion services in the black community, of targeting the community for “genocide” because of its “racist founder,” Margaret Sanger.

Change-up

We had to fight the rhetorical impact of the billboards by reframing the discourse as an attack on the autonomy of black women, shifting the focus away from the sad, beautiful black boy in the advertisements.

They tried to shame-and-blame black women who choose abortion

It was not accidental that they chose a black male child to feature in their messaging, exacerbating gender tensions in the African American community. We decided that the best approach was to emphasize our opponents’ negative subliminal messages about black women. Either we were dupes of abortion providers, or we were evil women intent on having abortions – especially of black male children – for selfish reasons. In their first narrative, we were victims without agency unable to make our own decisions, pawns of racist, profit-driven abortion providers. In their second narrative, we were the uncaring enemies of our own children, and architects of black genocide.

We decided on affirming messages that refuted both narratives. We had to manage both positive and negative emotions about abortion.

We repeatedly asserted our own agency as black women who are trustworthy, informed and politically savvy. We insisted that whether black women were pro-choice or pro-life, we were united in believing that black women could reasonably decide for ourselves whether to become parents. Freedom is inherent in black women and we would let no one limit our liberty. We aggressively linked women’s rights to civil and human rights.

Our messages: We decided to have abortions. We invited Margaret Sanger to place clinics in black neighborhoods. We are part of the civil and human rights movement. We protected the future of black children, not our opponents. We helped women. They judged them.

We found a resonating message of trusting black women that was widely embraced by African American women. This response forced our opponents to change their messages. They eventually declared—defensively—that they “do trust black women!” We knew we had scored a victory.

Researching the Opposition

We researched our opponents to debunk their emotional appeal that they were defending black children and women. At the same time, we resisted ad hominem attacks.

We kept asking the question, “Where do they get the money to finance their movement?”
With the support of Political Research Associates and the Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights, we looked at their connections and funding.

We learned from contacts that our opponents crafted this strategy in 2009 in a secret meeting on St. Simon’s Island in South Georgia between Georgia Right to Life (GRTL) and the Georgia Republican Party. They hoped to build an alliance between white and black conservatives, not only to restrict abortion access in Georgia but to split African American voters.

To provide an African American woman to champion the effort, Georgia Right to Life hired Catherine Davis, who failed twice at winning a Congressional seat as a black Republican. Davis’ partner was the Radiance Foundation that designed the billboard. It was set up by an advertising executive, Ryan Bomberger. Bomberger claims that he is the son of a white mother raped by a black man and that his mother gave him up for adoption because she did not believe in abortion. Bomberger says that it is his mission to save black babies, even if it means allowing rapists to choose the mothers of their children.

The billboard campaign was accompanied by a two-hour pseudo-documentary film, Maafa 21, that purported to trace the eugenics movement in promoting genocide against African Americans, and how abortion is part of it. It was created by a white Texan, Mark Crutcher, who has made a career of attacking Planned Parenthood. More than 20,000 copies were distributed free.

We looked at the cross-pollination between the anti-abortion movement and conservative figures from other arenas. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is employed by the anti-abortion Priests for Life and revealed a close relationship with Fox News’ host, Glenn Beck, even speaking at Beck’s August 2010 rally that attempted to hijack the symbolic legacy of Dr. King’s historic 1963 March on Washington. These associations did not aid her credibility in the African American community. Sarah Palin’s endorsement of the billboards tied their campaign to other conservative figures distrusted by the African American community.

We also learned that race and gender became a bait-and-switch tactic by our opponents. When they could not locate any black women who had abortions because of the race of the child – no surprise! – they switched tactics to claim that they were really concerned that Asian American women were having sex-selective abortions, using even more disguised racism against “foreigners” and hyperactivating prejudices against immigrants.

Putting Out Facts

Anti-abortionists misused data and facts. The cornerstone of their genocide theory is that black women have had fewer children over a number of years. In fact, women of all races have fewer children when they have increased access to reproductive health services and educational and job opportunities.

We won by shifting the debate and correcting our opponents’ ‘facts’

The reality is that black women have always controlled our fertility when we could. We brought knowledge from Africa that helped us practice birth control and have abortions. After the end of slavery, we were determined to end the forced breeding of our bodies, and we cut our birth rate in half in the first 40 years after the Civil War. We continued this intentional decline as part of our racial uplift strategy to have fewer children and provide more opportunities for the ones we did have.

Black women, however, do have three times more abortions than white women, a statistic anti-abortionists used to demonize abortion providers. Black women have more unintended pregnancies, less access to contraception, are more vulnerable to childhood sexual abuse, and experience single motherhood more than our white counterparts. For reproductive justice activists, the solution is to help black women have fewer unintended pregnancies and to eliminate the obstacles that interfere with personal decision making.

Another anti-abortion tactic is to claim that abortion clinics are “always” located in African American communities, especially by Planned Parenthood. In Georgia, we were able to easily refute this claim by presenting demographic data, proving that only four of the 15 abortion clinics in our state are in predominantly black neighborhoods.

We addressed the story of Margaret Sanger and her allegedly racist agenda. We documented that African American leaders had worked with Sanger in the 1930s to ask for clinics in black communities. We challenged our opponents’ historical revisionism by citing famous leaders like Mary McLeod Bethune, W.E.B. Dubois, Walter White, Mary Church Terrell, Rev. Adam Clayton Powell, Sr., and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and organizations like the NAACP, the National Urban League and the National Council of Negro Women. We dared them to call these icons of the civil rights movement pawns of a racist agenda.

A Trust of New Leadership

Engaging leaders of Civil Rights organizations was critical to informing the African American community about the true facts of black women’s lives. We reached out to Julian Bond, former chair of the NAACP, who had endorsed the 2004 March for Women’s Lives. We had a boost when anti-abortion activists chose to picket the 2010 NAACP National Convention, trying to force them to retract their support for reproductive justice. The support of the NAACP opened the door for other Civil Rights organizations to join us, such as Rainbow PUSH.

Women of color are able to build stronger alliances between the Civil Rights and Reproductive Justice movements. It is equally clear that most male-led Civil Rights organizations will not take the lead on gender justice issues on behalf of women, especially on a difficult issue such as abortion.

We stopped the legislation in Georgia in the final two hours of the legislative session. And then we sat down to consider future plans. We created the Trust Black Women Partnership, a long-term strategy to ensure that black women can mobilize wherever such campaigns appear in African American communities, and to generate deeper discussions about black women’s autonomy and human rights.

Our opponents will not retreat, but, in fact, will “re-load,” as Sarah Palin would say. Georgia Right to Life and the Radiance Foundation, working with Priests for Life and its $10 million war chest, announced plans to spread their campaign. Similar billboards have already appeared in Arkansas, Texas, Missouri and Tennessee.

The anti-abortion opponents changed their tactics: now they claim to promote adoption for black children as a more compassionate alternative to abortion, ignoring the fact that four out of five “hard to place” children in the adoption system are African American.

The struggle in Georgia also highlighted tensions within the pro-choice movement about the leadership of women of color. The pro-choice movement must overcome its historical reluctance to confront accusations of racism and genocide. It must work harder to understand the power of the reproductive justice framework. Mainstream organizations have to step back and let women of color lead when race and gender intersect in abortion politics.

Reproductive justice activists recognize that we all live in a system of white supremacy that affects everyone in America: no one is immune to racism. The failure to recognize this legacy jeopardizes our collective ability to defeat our mutual opponents. Working honestly on race and power relations is not only the right thing to do, but it is the smart thing to do to defeat race- and gender-based attacks on abortion and women’s rights.

Like this story? Your $10 tax-deductible contribution helps support our research, reporting, and analysis.

  • sebraunlin

    Thank you for explaining this complex dynamic. It isn’t that obvious, but your explanation rings true.

  • purplemistydez

    Wonderful article.  It always comes down to trusting women to make their own reporductive choices even if we would not choose the same thing.

  • mhowell

    The attempt by outside forces such as the anti-abortion groups behind funding of these billboards to disrupt the relationship between Black women and men is not new. But they were met with a well-organized and powerful campaign that turned the tables on them.

    I have a friend who saw one of these billboards on her way to and from work. She was appalled. I gave her the link to the Trust Black Women Campaign and she ended up sending the information to all her relatives and friends.

    Congrats, Sister Loretta, and keep up the good, correction – GREAT – work.

  • chrisrog

    There has always been a campaign to divide women along ethnic lines-thank you for making sure the real issues are up front.  No matter color, religious or economic background we must stay together each of us, for the good of all of us.  Thank you Sister Loretta-you make all of us proud,

  • goatini

    on Catholic radio this morning.  And not that there’s anything wrong with that, but my gaydar went off big time on his voice and intonation.  Not that there’s anything wrong with that, but there seem to be a disproportionate number of these types of males on Catholic radio.

    Getting sick and tired of these hypocrites flogging this non-issue, especially since we all know that they REALLY think the exact same thing that prominent Catholic “morality” scold Bill Bennett thinks about the situation.  

  • nonsense-nonsense

    -No one has ever claimed that abortion clinics are ‘always’ in minority neighborhoods, but that the majority of them are, which is a true statistic whether you like it or not.

    -In the U.S., the birth rate of males in the Asian community is statistically higher than the birth rate of females, indicating that Asians are aborting based on sex.

    -Black, White, Asian or Hispanic, it doesn’t matter. There are more people looking to adopt a newborn than there are newborns put up for adoption. Just try to adopt a newborn and you’ll be wait listed. Far too often pro-choicers conflate a newborn being put up for adoption and children being released into foster care to be the same thing; they aren’t. The majority of children waiting to be adopted weren’t specifically given up for adoption.

    -Have you ever seen the picture of Margaret Sanger giving a speech at a KKK rally?

    -Speaking of NYC, if someone can’t afford contraceptives, then how can they afford an abortion? You can’t expect me to believe that someone can’t spend $5 for a box of condoms, but have $300+ for an abortion. Fact is that it comes down to laziness, and it’s something you support under the guise of choice. Nowhere else in the U.S. do 60% of a certain demographic’s pregnancies end in abortion, yet they do in the abortion capital of the U.S. Just think about that.

    -There was more, but I cbf to write anything else.

  • ahunt

    -In the U.S., the birth rate of males in the Asian community is statistically higher than the birth rate of females, indicating that Asians are aborting based on sex.

     

    This is interesting. Does this stat cut across all the highly varied Asian communities, or does it reflect trends in the more recent immigrant demographic?

     

    -Black, White, Asian or Hispanic, it doesn’t matter. There are more people looking to adopt a newborn than there are newborns put up for adoption. Just try to adopt a newborn and you’ll be wait listed.

     

    So what?

     

    Far too often pro-choicers conflate a newborn being put up for adoption and children being released into foster care to be the same thing; they aren’t. The majority of children waiting to be adopted weren’t specifically given up for adoption.

     

    Your point being? Because mine is that there are actually plenty of children available for adoption.

     

    -Have you ever seen the picture of Margaret Sanger giving a speech at a KKK rally?

     

    No. Sad.

    -Speaking of NYC, if someone can’t afford contraceptives, then how can they afford an abortion? You can’t expect me to believe that someone can’t spend $5 for a box of condoms, but have $300+ for an abortion. Fact is that it comes down to laziness, and it’s something you support under the guise of choice. Nowhere else in the U.S. do 60% of a certain demographic’s pregnancies end in abortion, yet they do in the abortion capital of the U.S. Just think about that.

     

    Thinking, thinking, thinking…so your response is that this certain lazy and irresponsible demographic should instead be forced to give birth and put the children up for adoption…correct?

     

  • ldan

    Wonderful piece detailing this particular battle and with so many lessons for the ongoing ones.  Thank you for the detailed report.

  • ldan

    -No one has ever claimed that abortion clinics are ‘always’ in minority neighborhoods, but that the majority of them are, which is a true statistic whether you like it or not.

    The majority are in low-income neighborhoods, which happen to be disproportionately minority. (The income to skin color correlation is a tangent I’m not addressing just now) The fact that middle to upper class women can often rely on health insurance that allows them to have their abortions at hospitals and offices that are not stand-alone abortion or reproductive health clinics may be an inconvenient piece of data for the conclusions that we’re apparently meant to draw from the above factoid.

     

    And your last point just goes back to “so they’re lazy” without looking at any factors other than the cost of condoms vs. abortions. Way to be respectful and show your depth of expertise and scholarship.

     

    As for the last line after accusing an entire group of laziness? Snrk. wow.

     

  • bj-survivor

    This is a wonderful article. The systemic racism of the mainstream feminist movement is a crying shame, and is devastating to the movement, as you have so eloquently illustrated. Sister Song and its allies have shown to have a far greater grasp of what a successful pushback against forced-birther propaganda looks like than the anemic white “leadership” of the mainstream pro-choice movement.

  • crowepps

    In the U.S., the birth rate of males in the Asian community is statistically higher than the birth rate of females, indicating that Asians are aborting based on sex.

    And the birth rate of males in the White community is 1050 per 1000 females and the birth of males in the Black community is 1036 to 1000 females, and the birth rate of males in the ENTIRE WORLD is greater than the number of females in every single country except two, indicating that it is entirely normal for more males than females to be born. 

  • arekushieru

    BJ, while I absolutely believe that Susan B. Anthony opposed abortion on the basis that it was a tool of the patriarchy, I also believe she, and her fellow suffragettes, were racist.

  • therealistmom

    So was EVERYONE. Pretending that this wasn’t the case doesn’t do anyone any favors. Abraham Lincoln was a flaming racist. H. G. Wells was a “progressive” thinker yet he published some horrifyingly racist ideas. When those ideas are the “norm” and you believe they are based on science and sociology, that’s what you are likely to believe until convinced otherwise.

     

     

  • plume-assassine

    -No one has ever claimed that abortion clinics are ‘always’ in minority neighborhoods, but that the majority of them are, which is a true statistic whether you like it or not.

    Guess you didn’t read this part: “We decided to have abortions. We invited Margaret Sanger to place clinics in black neighborhoods.”

     

    -Have you ever seen the picture of Margaret Sanger giving a speech at a KKK rally?

    Margaret Sanger did not invent birth control or abortion. Black women have been managing their fertility for thousands of years.

     

    Speaking of NYC, if someone can’t afford contraceptives, then how can they afford an abortion? You can’t expect me to believe that someone can’t spend $5 for a box of condoms, but have $300+ for an abortion. Fact is that it comes down to laziness, and it’s something you support under the guise of choice. Nowhere else in the U.S. do 60% of a certain demographic’s pregnancies end in abortion, yet they do in the abortion capital of the U.S. Just think about that.

    So, your “solution” then is to physically & emotionally punish Black women for this perceived “laziness“… by forcing them to give birth to every unwanted pregnancy or otherwise telling them that they are perpetuating a “genocide” conspiracy within their own community. Oh, yes, that makes a lot of sense.

  • forlife

    I believe most people are aware of that. I think the OP’s point was pretty clear: the birth rate of Asian-American males is higher even after adjusting for the (almost universal) higher male birth rate, especially if the family already has at least one girl. This was not the case among Asian-Americans before prenatal technology was able to determine the gender of the child. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=89284549

  • colleen

    I also believe she, and her fellow suffragettes, were racist.

     The folks opposed to women’s sufferage were racist too. Speaking as someone who has spent a lot of time back in the stacks reading local newspapers from the turn of the century (or rather, the 19th-20th century) I assure you that racism was endemic, pervasive and socially acceptable just about everywhere.

     

     

  • bj-survivor

    At least now it isn’t socially acceptable, though it is still all too endemic. :(

     

    As evidenced by history, the pace of actions catching up with philosophy is glacial, so I guess there is still hope, right?

  • crowepps

    As was suspicion of foreigners, sexism, intolerance on the basis of religion, etc.  This is precisely the ‘progress’ which the conservatives find intolerable and want to repeal.

  • freetobe

    back in the 50′s and my adopted mother told me she was on a waiting list as well and this was way before abortion was legal.

    This has absolutley nothing to do with abortion. Why are there so many children in foster care? Why because noone wants damaged or older children. I was adopted as a baby and I replaced one that had died the same day I was born.

    I fyou want a child so much there are plenty out there that need loving homes. half the part of raising a child is putting up with all the not so cute and fun things. Raising a child is the HARDEST job on earth if you do it right!

  • freetobe

    males are weaker than female infants so nature makes up for this by more males being born as their survival rate is not as good. AHA I always knew we women were the stronger sex in other ways than muscle mass!!

  • ldan

    And the solution to this inequity is…?

     

    I’m betting that ‘changing the cultural perception of the value of female children,’ wasn’t the first thing on your list, was it?

     

    While I decry the beliefs that result in that bias against female children, I don’t think the solution is to put barriers to abortion in place. Somehow I don’t think that unwanted girl children are going to fare very well in those circumstances.

  • forlife

    Well, I volunteer for All Girls Allowed, which is an organization that works to end gendercide in China by promoting the value of girls in society. It is a great organization, and I strongly recommend people support it with time and/or money. If you are involved in any similar organizations, please do let me know so I can support them.

    Sadly, it is very difficult to “change the cultural perception of the value of female children” in America when pro-choicers will vote down your comment to try to censure the truth that many people rip their offspring to shreds simply because they are female.

     

     

  • forlife

    Just curious…

    What do people think the solution is to the “black people have a high rate of unplanned pregnancy and STDs” issue? I might believe that some children or teenagers are ignorant of sexuality. But what about people (of any race) who are adults? I always hear people promote “sex ed.” But adults know how babies are made and STDs are contracted. And I imagine adults are the majority of those with unplanned pregnancies and STDs. I have visited the US many times, and the contraception is just as cheap and widely available as it is here in Europe.

    I understand some might find this offensive, but I honestly just do not get why the STD/unplanned pregnancy rate is so high in the States? Can anyone offer insight?

  • plume-assassine

    Abortion isn’t the problem. Cultural perceptions on femaleness are. I agree that gender selection is a problem in China, but preventing women from having sex-selective abortions only brings children in the world who are much more likely to be neglected, abandoned, or abused in the current culture. That kind of suffering/child abuse is far worse than any kind of “suffering” that you associate with abortion. Of course, forced abortion and coercion are real problems, and it’s good that you are working to educate people about this. But banning elective abortion as a whole isn’t a good tactic, and in fact will only make the fate of girl children even worse in the long run, if re-education about the value of girls/women in society isn’t the #1 priority. With better education, there will be fewer cases of abused/neglected girls, and a decrease in the desire for sex-selective abortion.

  • arekushieru

    will vote down your comment to try to censure the truth that many people rip their offspring to shreds simply because they are female.

    First of all, this isn’t censoring your comments.  Anyone can click on a grey-highlighted post and see what it says, again.

     

    Secondly, you wonder why people WOULD censor your posts with comments like ‘rip their offspring to shreds’?

  • arekushieru

    Going by this logic, though, all adults should know complex math equations just because they are adults and already know the basics.  Knowing ‘how babies are made and STD’s are contracted’ is only equivalent to the most basic of math, after all.  Comprehensive sex-ed would give all adults the information they need to correctly use contraception/birth control and prevent unplanned pregnancies.  Besides, no contraceptive/birth control is 100% effective.

  • carolyninthecity

    Also, abstinence-only education is sort of a problem in the states. 

    When you’re raised to be ignorant to the facts, and are never told any real information, that doesn’t automatically change when you reach adulthood. Those messages and false information stay with you. 

     

    an entire country afraid to talk openly and honestly about sex is just asking for unplanned pregnancies and stds. Not the most thorough analysis, I know. But that’s the insight I’d offer to you. 

  • forced-birth-rape

    And you say well we can get ten children out of that aborted girl, all she is is breeding chattel to pro-lifers. You do not give a damn about girls you want all girls pregnant, if they get pregnant by rape happy, happy-day for pro-lifers. I would rather be aborted then be born to a pro-lifer.

  • colleen

    an organization that works to end gendercide in China by promoting the value of girls in society.

     

    I strongly recommend that the ‘pro-life’ movement start imagining  the value of girls in US society as more than masturbatory aids, gestation devices and the best source of cheap and free labor.

  • ahunt

    Promote the value of girls…? Details, please.

  • mechashiva

    1. Family-planning clinics are generally placed where there is the greatest need for their services. In wealthier areas, people go to priuvate docs that are covered by their insurance plan. In poor areas, people rely on low-cost clinics that recieve federal funding… like family planning clinics (“abortion clinics” to you).

     

    2. Actually, there are other reasons why more Asian American males are born than females. Without any evidence to suggest the discrepancy is caused by abortion, you are simply speculating based on racist stereotypes. Asian Americans are not all 1st generation migrants from China and India.

     

    3. There are other reasons why people don’t choose adoption. For one thing, going through a pregnancy and giving birth are really damned expensive and risky… if you aren’t getting a child out of the deal, it doesn’t seem worthwhile. What’s the incentive for birth moms?

     

    4. No. I’ve seen pictures of suffragettes making black women walk at the back of their marches, though, and I still think women should have the right to vote. Similarly, I know Margaret Sanger had her unsavory bits, but I still think women should have the right to contraception and abortion.

     

    5. When people are poor, they only allow themselves to regularly spend money on essentials. Sex isn’t seen as essential, and neither is birth control. That is something that would be nice to have, but they can’t justify the expense for each month. Instead, people just hedge their bets. If a pregnancy occurs, then it suddenly takes precedence over everything else (whether it ends in abortion or birth). For an abortion, I’ve seen patients take up collections from friends if they can, but if not they go for payday loans and put themselves into debt… because they know that giving birth would be even more expensive. Abortion becomes a financial necessity at that point, and the desperation ensures people will do whatever they must to get one. It isn’t laziness… it is having so few resources that only the most urgent bills get paid, and planning ahead is a luxury they don’t think they can justify to themselves. This is why it is important for contraception to be low-cost or free to all people. It saves money for everyone, and it reduces ethical conflict by preventing unintended pregnancies in the first place.

  • mechashiva

    Mmhm… By the way, the article you posted emphasizes that they don’t know for sure if sex-selective abortion is responsible or if it is some other gender-selective medical technology like sperm-selection (separates X from Y sperm so that insemination heavily favors the selected gender), in-vitro fertilization, etc.

  • mechashiva

    I bet it is because Y-sperm swim faster than X-sperm (this is actually true).

  • crowepps

    And as I read it, it is talking about a gender bias in SECOND children, where the first child was ALREADY a girl.  Don’t see anywhere it says that first girl is discarded.  There are a lot of people who want an ‘ideal family’ with a boy and a girl, and early abortion is certainly much less barbarous than the traditional infanticide.

  • cc

    “but that the majority of them are, which is a true statistic whether you like it or not”

    “True” – really? How bout the true statistic that, according to Guttmacher, 62% of clinics are in white, non Hispanic neighborhoods and only 9% in black neighborhoods.

    “Nowhere else in the U.S. do 60% of a certain demographic’s pregnancies end in abortion, yet they do in the abortion capital of the U.S. Just think about that”

    And this is your business, how? If women of any demographic want to terminate their pregnancies, it’s their choice.

  • katwa

    I have visited the US many times, and the contraception is just as cheap and widely available as it is here in Europe.

    What?? Where in the US is it cheap?

     

    Not to mention Repubs want to defund Planned Parenthood, one of the only places that actually offers affordable contraception.

     

    I myself pay $500 a year for contraception, and that is not including the yearly exam I need to even get any birth control.

     

    But adults know how babies are made and STDs are contracted. 

    Really? You’d be surprised. When you grow up in a religious household that never discusses sex except to say “It’s dirty, save it for marriage” and you get abstinence ed in school which says nothing useful, just “Wedding rings will prevent STDs and pregnancy!” you really DON’T know how to prevent pregnancy or STDs. Knowing how “babies are made” is not enough. most people think “sex” creates babies but can’t even agree on what “sex” is. Preventing a pregnancy requires more knowledge than that. Can you prevent an STD when you think being married makes STDs impossible? Can you prevent HIV when you are straight but think only gay people can get HIV? Can you do calculus if you know what math is?

     

    And what about when contraception fails?