Radiance Foundation Moves On Down To Texas


Editor’s note: Read all of RH Reality Check’s coverage of this racist anti-choice campaign.

The Radiance Foundation, an anti-choice group intent on using racial divides to try and eliminate women’s access to abortion, has picked a new target and launched a new set of billboards in Texas.  And, much like their launch in Georgia, they are making quite a stir.

From KENS5 News in San Antonio:

A controversial new anti-abortion billboard campaign focusing on blacks in Texas is making its way to Houston. The campaign has already made its way to the Bryan-College Station area and is expected to be in Houston soon.

The billboards read ‘Black and Unwanted’ and show an image of a baby’s face. The campaign’s website, toomanyaborted.com, appears at the bottom.

“This campaign wants to expose the destruction of hope and possibility that abortion brings and offer something that is a life affirming solution like adoption or parenthood,” said Ryan Bomberger, one of the creators of the Radiance Foundation.

Houston Press, the local alt-weekly, finds itself unimpressed by the campaign (in fact, so unimpressed they couldn’t even get the foundation’s name correct the first time):

Perhaps because it would take up too much room to say “Honk if You Love Insane Conspiracy Theories,” the new super-creepy billboards in Bryan simply show an African-American child under the terrifying slogan “Black & Unwanted.”

Welcome to life as viewed through the paranoid lens of The Radiance Foundation, which teamed up with a Georgia anti-choice group to plaster similar billboards throughout that state. Now Texas gets to learn about why black kids are, per the Radiance Foundation, an “endangered species.” (For the record, black children, like white children, are of the species “human,” which is of the genus “homo,” so we’re a little concerned about the Radiance Foundation’s wording, although we get their point).

We’ll have to wait to see if the Bryan billboards take the same kind of heat they did in Georgia, where a group called SisterSong petitioned to have them removed. The head of that group, which calls itself a “women of color reproductive justice collective,” told one publication that the Radiance Foundation tells black women “that we are now responsible for the genocide of our own people…We are now accused of ‘lynching’ our children in our wombs and practicing white supremacy on ourselves…This is what lies on steroids look like.”

Looks like Radiance might be in for a cold shoulder regardless of how far south they are.

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