• wildorchid

    Most of the menstrual cups are made from 100% medical-grade silicone. So no possibly dangerous chemicals! And they are much more comfortable than tampons and don’t smell like pads.

    • prochoiceferret

      Most of the menstrual cups are made from 100% medical-grade silicone. So no possibly dangerous chemicals! And they are much more comfortable than tampons and don’t smell like pads.

      And you only have to buy them once, which helps with the whole accessibility-to-low-income-women thing.

       

      Sadly, many women get a bit skeeved out by the possibility of having to clean out their cups in a washroom sink, where other women might see it….

  • saltyc

    Out of my daughter’s old cloth diapers. Very simple and cheap, sounds gross but it’s not. Sometimes I soak them in peroxide to take out stains, but usually if you keep them soaked in water in a container for the five days, then wash in cold water with some vinegar they won’t stain too bad.

  • ahunt

    Exactly, and it is a reasonable skeeve, unless one carries chlorax wipes in their purse.

  • teedub

    I’ve recently tried the cup and love it! I also noticed much less bleeding, or more specifically, fewer days spent bleeding. “Normally” when using tampons, I would spend close to 5 days menstating. With the cup, i swear it was like 2.5 days and one of those days was super light.

    I suspect but have no proof, that tampons have a chemical that makes you bleed more, thus neccistating a need to purchase more tampons.

  • prochoiceferret

    Exactly, and it is a reasonable skeeve, unless one carries chlorax wipes in their purse.

    What, you mean for the bloody bits of uterine lining that won’t quite make it through the strainer at the bottom of the sink? I thought it was more common to just empty the cup into the toilet, then rinse it in the sink…

  • qob

    but you don’t have to fully clean them at every change. In fact, leaving a bit of fluid on them makes them easier to reinsert.

    Empty the cup down the toilet, (wipe with tissue if you like), reinsert, wipe fingers, THEN go wash your hands at the public sink with no more blood on your hands than you’d get from using pads or tampons.

  • prochoiceferret

    but you don’t have to fully clean them at every change. In fact, leaving a bit of fluid on them makes them easier to reinsert.

    Huh. So I guess it really is possible to use a cup without other women in the washroom being the wiser. Good to know.

     

    All you’re left with then is the skeeviness many women feel at having to reach in, without a convenient applicator….

  • jaz

    Thanks for the comments and suggestions! I have been thinking about trying the cup but have been a little hesitant and fearful…like what if I don’t put it in right, it leaks, I break it, etc. Now I’m inspired, ladies!

  • catseye71352

    I’m just relieved I no longer have to deal with it.  <]:-P

  • dialzero

    Not at all necessary.  The cup holds so much that most people can go the whole day without having to empty it in public.  For the heavy bleeders among us, we have learned to take a damp paper towel in the stall to wipe the cup off with.  There’s this misconception that tampons are sterile and therefore menstrual cups should be as well, but that’s just not true or necessary.

    Thanks to my cup, I don’t have leaks, and I have not walked down “that” aisle of a drugstore in 8 years… I could not be happier about this!

  • halli620

    If you buy them in bulk, like from Amazon.com or the special prices for 12+ from drugstore.com, they’re much more reasonable than individually at places like Whole Foods.

     

    Love the non-applicator ones – so easy to carry around, and no extra garbage created.

Mobile Theme