• invalid-0

    Thanks for providing this real-life perspective.

  • invalid-0

    Frankly, I’d argue that you went above and beyond your responsibilities to “conscience” in the case of Melissa. If she was hemorrhaging and at risk of death, someone’s “conscience” should not be allowed to hinder saving a life.

  • invalid-0

    I agree, this procedure was above and beyond what should have been required. This patient could have died in the time it took to get her prepared and to an operating room across the hospital. In order to preserve the delicate sensibilities of a single nurse, (who should not have been there to begin with if she was morally abject to sometimes needed procedures performed in that area) a patient’s life was put at severe risk of harm or death. I certainly hope that at the very least someone explained to this woman afterward that her “morals” could have killed a woman going to a hospital expecting quality medical care, and instead she was treated as less valuable than the “morals” of this nurse, who chose to work in a field where she knew she would be expected to perform duties she may object to, and decided instead of going into a different field where there would be no need for a choice between her morals and the life of a patient, she chose to put how many patients at risk by refusing to provide the care that she was trained and hired for? If you can’t or won’t do a job, then you shouldn’t take the job to begin with. As a tech support worker, I would be fired or at the least disciplined for refusing to work with particular operating systems, computer brands, or individual customers, because this is the job I was hired to do. In the health care field, ability and willingness to do ones job is far more paramount. If I should refuse to do my job, a customer may simply have to go without internet service for a few more minutes while another technician is found, or until he or she can call another support line for assistance. In the medical field however, that refusal to do the job that a person is hired for can be the difference between a healing patient and a dead one. The possible ramifications of this are terrifying.

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