• invalid-0

    A pharmacist not dispensing Plan B to a patient has NOTHING whatsoever to do with a pharmacist not doing his or her job or not showing up for work. Pharmacists are often expected to show up at work when they are sick. There often isn’t anyone to cover their shifts when they are ill. You are so way off base in saying that they can refuse to do their jobs for any old reason. And, apparently, quite ignorant. Now, to the point of dispensing Plan B. If one pharmacist doesn’t want to carry Plan B in his or her store, there is always another pharmacist, if not many more pharmacists, in the area that will. That’s what I got from your story! Why didn’t you get that??? What is the freakin’ big deal? Last time I checked, this is a free market capitalistic society that we live in. No one is required to stock or sell anything in his or her store. Welcome to the USA!

  • invalid-0

    The big deal is that Plan B is a legal over the counter drug. The effectiveness of the drug decreases as time goes on. A woman should NOT have to run around an entire city to find this medication when it is well within her rights to obtain it. The fact that you can find it in other places may seem moot in a place where there are lots of pharmacies, but what about suburbs or rural areas? I have used Plan B before and the place I went had it, but was shutting down for lunch and I almost had a panic attack in the middle of the store because I had to wait an hour before I could get it. It was a terrifying feeling, and no one should have to feel that way when they are trying to get Plan B. Pharmacists that refuse to give this out are denying the rights of women to make their own choices and that is a huge deal.

  • invalid-0

    If you go into a movie theater or get on an airplane, note where the exits are. Before you jump in a pool, make sure it has water. Carry more than one kind of credit card. Be prepared. Arm yourself with if/then knowledge. If you are sexually active, know where you can buy Plan B. It’s as simple as that. And no, it is NOT a big deal.

  • invalid-0

    Oh, I forgot… Know what your pharmacy’s hours are & when the staff takes its lunch break. Knowledge is power!

  • invalid-0

    You’ll have to excuse me for not considering that my pharmacist might have had a lunch break when I was trying NOT to have a baby that I didn’t want. I get your point about being prepared, but Plan B is called emergency contraception for a reason. I was kind of having an emergency, and the emotions involved in that are hard to describe. I offered up that example because I KNEW I would be able to get it at that location, but hitting a speed bump was scary. I can’t imagine going to a pharmacy and having someone tell me that they wouldn’t give me what I needed and then having to go somewhere else, especially when time is important.

    I was so, so grateful that I had that option when I needed it. Really – so glad for all of the people who, I’m sure, had to work very hard to get Plan B to be over the counter. I was happy that I knew about it and could take the situation into my own hands and make my own decision about what was right for me. I wish that all women could have that and not have to deal with BS from some pharmacist standing on some ‘higher’ moral ground.

  • invalid-0

    “Know what your pharmacy’s hours are & when the staff takes its lunch break.”

    You’re being silly.

  • invalid-0

    The point is it isn’t up to the pharmacy to decide what medication a woman needs or should have. That decision is up to the woman and her doctor to decide. When pharmacists are required to go through years of medical school, and have the same kind of education required of an OBGYN I will accept that a pharmacist can decide what medication a woman needs or can be given. Pharmacists are in a unique position of providing needed medications to people who require them. They are not in any position to diagnose any illness, or decide treatment for such illness. Would we really be having this conversation if pharmacies were denying patients needed hemopheliac treatments (which can be made from blood and are considered blood products) for religious or “moral” reasons? Of course we wouldn’t, because hemophelia, and such illnesses are not conditiones that are only suffered by women. Wheather society as a whole is willing to admit it or not, women are still considered second class citizens, particularly in the instance of health care. This point is no more obvious than in the case of women being denied needed health services while men are eagerly provided medications like viagra, which serve only to put women in need of those health services the religious right is so anxious to deny.

  • http://www.smilelifestyle.com invalid-0

    It’ll be best if people just ask their own personal doctors to recommend trusted pharmacies for them. I don’t buy the women-as-second-class-citizens. That kind of labeling is already extinct.

    • invalid-0

      That kind of labeling will never be extinct as long as there are those who can and would deny women the health care they need and deserve based on their own ideals and morals without regard to the needs or health of the women they are supposed to be serving.

  • invalid-0

    Arm yourself with if/then knowledge. If you are sexually active, know where you can buy Plan B.

    I would go one further and recommend that if you are sexually active, keep Plan B on hand. Remember to keep your supply current – the pills have a shelf life of 4 years. If you have a daughter living with you who is or may be sexually active, the same thing goes.

    Of course, being able to defeat the attempts of small-minded individuals to deny you access to contraception in no way excuses those attempts. Still, until the day that women don’t need the personal approval of their local neighbourhood zealot to obtain legally approved medication, secure your supply in advance.

  • invalid-0

    I will say this is good advice, but it is sad that it’s come to a point that it should have to be.

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