Roundup: S.E.X., New HIV Test, Indian Sex Ed


Dr. Karen Rayne reviews Heather Corinna’s new book, s.e.x., saying it’s a great resource for teens who want to cut through the fluff and get good, solid, fact-based information about sex. She also notes that "it is a great resource for parents to keep on the shelf at all times in case the
teenagers in your house suddenly have a burning question about a particular
sex-related topic."

On Broadsheet Tracy Clark-Flory writes a good summary of a bizzare murder case in Fort Worth, TX. A woman who was caught by her husband having an affair cried that she was actually being raped. Her husband shot his wife’s lover in the head and a grand jury convicted her of involuntary manslaughter; meanwhile her husband, who pulled the trigger, walks free. Shakesville’s Melissa McEwan wrote that "the argument is that he never would have pulled that trigger without her lie,
but why does that mean he should be exempt from punishment? If she had been
telling the truth, and he had killed an actual rapist, it’s still
wrong.
"

The Montreal Gazette reports that a new rapid HIV saliva test is being field-tested in India. Results show that the knowlege of HIV infection has been "highly effective in preventing transmission of the virus from HIV-positive
mothers to their children."

A coalition of 80 conservative groups have sent a letter to President Bush asking him to ban federal funding for "family planning groups that provide abortion referrals or share facilities with
abortion providers."

Lack of fact-based, comprehensive sex education in schools is not just a concern for a majority of parents in the United States. A recent survey of 72 school districts in Goa, India shows that a majority of parents in the Eastern coastal state want sex education as part of their children’s curriculum.

Breast feeding is on the rise in the US, according to a survey by the CDC, writes the New York Times. About 77 percent of new mothers breast-feed their infants at least briefly while only 60 percent did so in 1993.

 

Like this story? Your $10 tax-deductible contribution helps support our research, reporting, and analysis.